April 23, 2018 - Turbochargers have been around for many years and have become an industry standard on most forestry machines.
April 23, 2018 - In 2017, Tigercat developed and released its most compact skidder platform, the 602 series. The prototype 602 skidder was sent to France last summer to be fitted with a Belgian designed and manufactured swing boom for use in mountain regions of Europe.Now the 602 is available as a cable skidder suited to pockets of North America and other traditional winch skidder markets. The 602 cable skidder is ideal for high value selective hardwood logging and for retrieving timber from steep slopes and gullies.The 602 is equipped with the Tigercat FPT Tier N45 engine which provides full emissions compliance for Tier 2 and Tier 4f , along with excellent fuel economy. Both engines deliver 125 kW (168 hp) at 2,200 rpm.The machine has a fixed front axle with an oscillating centre section to achieve a very narrow overall width of 2,7 metres (106 in). The agility of the 602 is ideal in selective felling applications. The machine can access high value timber in steep terrain, while minimizing damage to the residual stand.Maximum fuel efficiency is achieved by the use of Tigercat’s load sensing hydraulic system — only supplying the amount of oil that the various functions require for reduced engine load.The 602 cable skidder offering has already attracted a lot of attention in the United States, where the first machine debuted at the Paul Bunyan show in Cambridge, Ohio this past October.Bill Shufflebotham, based in Rockport, Illinois purchased the first 602 cable skidder. He states, “It’s the only quality small machine on the market. It’s easy to move at nine feet wide and it’s powerful.”
April 18, 2018 - Indexator’s new generation of hose swivels — the K100 — continues to gain ground in the forest sector. With its ball-free design the swivel withstands heavy side loads and peak pressure while eliminating the problem with twisting hoses. Hydraulic hoses are sensitive for twisting and only a few degrees of twist can reduce hose life by up to 90 per cent. The elimination of twists increases hydraulic hose lifetime substantially. The ball-less design makes the K100-swivel suitable for applications with heavy side loads, high pull force and modern machines with high pressure and flow. With less downtime due to leakage the K100 increases profitability for everyone. “The K100 has been a true success. Especially on extreme applications — for example on hoses to harvester heads and felling heads where you have a lot of bending forces going into the swivel,” says Johnny Karlsson, area sales manager at Indexator Rotator Systems. The modular construction also provides major customization opportunities with many different connection and seal principles. Due to few components the maintenance of the swivels is easy. “Our customers really like the compact design with small external diameter. It is a clear advantage when you have limited installation space,” says Karlsson. Main advantages of K100: New design with powerful slide bearings Resistant to heavy side loads Secure solution — it cannot be forced apart during work Withstands high pressure levels Surface treatment that is highly corrosion and wear resistant Dirt and water-resistant seal that protects from outside particles Seal and support ring for high pressure Easy maintenance Hardened bearing surfaces Compact dimensions Optimized design with few parts Indexator Rotator Systems AB is a global leader in the manufacture of rotators, swivels and accessories. Today, Indexator is an extremely strong brand in the forestry, material handling and recycling industries all over the world. The company conducts world-class R&D that includes a dedicated, in-house test lab that international equipment manufacturers also turn to to develop new products and functions. Indexator currently has 140 employees and annual sales of around SEK 230 million. A high proportion of its sales go to export, with around 80 per cent of production being sold to more than 40 markets around the world.
April 16, 2018 - Doosan Infracore North America, LLC, has expanded its dealer network with the addition of Eastrock Equipment Canada as an authorized sales, service, parts and rental provider of Doosan equipment. The dealership is located at 2020 Bantree Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1B 5A4.
April 11, 2018 - Ponsse presents the new loader for Elephant and ElephantKing forwarders. The completely new Ponsse K121 loader offers a new level of efficiency and speed for load handling in tough conditions. 
April 10, 2018 - To help customers process increased volumes of waste materials, Rotochopper introduces a new 1,000 horsepower dual-motor drive option for the B-66 E electric-powered horizontal grinder. The dual-motor drive is designed to reduce operating and maintenance costs compared to a single-motor drive, as well as minimize amperage surges at start-up.
April 6, 2018 - The Atlantic Heavy Equipment Show roots its inception to 1986 when the first Atlantic Industrial Equipment Show (as it was then called) took place in Moncton, N.B. The event, which runs every other year, has been owned and sponsored by the Atlantic Land Improvement Contractors (ALICA) since the beginning and has been managed by Master Promotions Ltd. following the 1990 show. The 2018 edition is running for two days at the Moncton Coliseum and has brought out thousands of visitors so far to see the latest and greatest in forestry and road construction equipment from more than 190 exhibitors. The show’s 2016 edition brought out a record number of 14,700 visitors. Canadian Forest Industries was there to spotlight the newest innovations on the market for forestry. Below is a list of some of the equipment on display at AHES 2018! Steep terrain harvester Eco Log showcased its new 688E eight-wheel harvester specially designed for work in steep terrain, which minimizes ground pressure when working on sensitive ground. The Eco Log 688E combines its Volvo Penta D8 engine with its versatility and flexibility to be ready for the toughest job. The 688E has three turnable motors available as an option, new hoods to increase serviceability, improved mid-area stability, improved control of the tilt plate and an updated operator cab and service platform. www.ecologforestry.com Forwarder with operator in focus Eco Log also displayed its 574 forwarder as part of its E-series forwarders, which are developed with the operator in mind. With an entirely new cabin where space, comfort and visibility have been prioritized, the E-series forwarders provide a whole new operating experience. The Volvo Penta engines provide fuel efficiency, immediate response on increased workload and easy maintenance. The IQAN control system has been improved with additional integrated functions. The new control unit has a 7” touch screen. The 574E comes with optional utility blade and brush guard. www.ecologforestry.com Horizontal grinder Morbark’s new 3400X and 3400XT wood hog horizontal grinders were introduced by dealer Cardinal Equipment. Both feature sloped infeed sides and an additional 24” (60.96 cm) infeed length, which gives the operator improved visibility and loading efficiency. The variable speed infeed system consists of one 34” (86.26 cm) diameter top compression feed roll with internal drive and a 16’ long x 57 ½ “ (4.88 m x 146 cm) wide live floor equipped with four strands of WDH-120 chain in a staggered configuration. Cardinal Equipment is also the new dealer for Rayco for tree care products, manufacturing grinders, and millers. www.cardinalsaw.com/eng/ Harvester head Waratah’s recently updated H290 harvester head has been optimized for performance. It is a robust and powerful harvester head built for exceptional feeding and delimbing performance. The extra-efficient top saw option enables easy topping for increased stem utilization, boosting operational productivity. The H290 has a maximum upper delimb opening of 800 mm, maximum feed roller opening of 760 mm and a maximum cutting capacity of 750 mm. The H290 is used in harvesting in late thinnings or regeneration harvesting and is productive in crooked or straight wood. It can be applied in softwood harvesting, hardwood harvesting and debarking. www.waratah.com Lubricant Sinto Lubrication Experts showcased its new Synthetic HD Diesel Motor Oil. Their unique formula including calciumtech and antifriction technology ensures the motor maximum performance while the fuel efficiency technology offers greater fuel economy. The oil is exceptional in engine protection, facilitates startup of the engine in cold weather, extends the frequency of oil changes and maximizes fuel economy. It is available in 4 L, 20 L, 55 L and 205 L formats. www.sintoexpert.com Harvester head AFM Forest’s AFM 65 harvester head is a strong, reliable and highly productive harvester head for medium sized wood which can work on both wheeled and tracked machines. AFM 65 means an optimal combination between capacity, weight, feeding power and force and is an efficient tool for clearcuttings, big thinnings and processing operations. Four movable knives on AFM 65 allow smooth and accurate delimbing even of big trees with heavy branches. The shape of knives on AFM 65 allows easy working from pile or in wind stormed areas. AFM 65 can work with a variety of different measuring systems and can be easily adapted to any type of base machine. The AFM 65 is perfectly suited for 20-25 tons excavators, wheeled and tracked harvesters. http://www.afm-forest.com Band sawmill that thinks forward Logosol’s new Swedish-made band sawmill 751 cuts every board to exact dimensions. In its basic configuration it can saw 4.8 metres (15.75 ft.). It can manage large diameter logs, up to 75 cm (2.5 ft.) in diameter. Logosol’s own band sawmill is robust and has several well-thought-out features that will facilitate when working at the sawing site. Fixed sawing measurements allow for easily produce desired dimensions, quickly and accurately. The 751 is a stable and extremely functional sawmill that comes with a preassembled sawhead and a detailed user manual including band blade, adjustable feet, two log clamps, log supports, toe board, water cooling and adjustable blade guide. The Logosol 751 is distributed by Silvana. www.silvanatrading.com High production mulcher Promac displayed its new LDM 40 high production mulcher which is light on weight and heavy on performance. Combined with Promac’s optional hydraulically actuated rear door and forward offset rotor design, the superior forward and rear exposure of the rotor to the foliage is very efficient for mulching standing trees, brush and even tall grass, leaving consistent chip-style mulch. The standard features include an efficient 33cc hydraulic gear motor and 40” cutting width. The LDM 40 is suitable for excavators as small as eight tonnes and rubber-tired excavators. It is equipped with the Promac “Chip Production Rotor” and has a dual-face, chipper-style tooling with sharpening capabilities for longer life, as well as an innovative “drop out” rotor frame designed for ease of maintenance. www.promacgroup.ca Material handler The Fuchs MHL 350 F HD material handler was on display by dealer A.L.P.A. Equipment Ltd. The operating weight is 78,925–87,303 lbs. It has a six-cylinder inline engine and Stage Tier 4f exhaust emission standard. The hydraulic system’s main pump is an adjustable double displacement pump in an open circuit. The auxiliary pumps are gear pumps in the open circuit for supplying auxiliary loads. The transmission is a variable speed hydraulic motor with travel brake valve, two-speed power shift transmission and four-wheel drive. The braking systems is a hydraulically operated dual-circuit service braking system with multi-disk brakes. Fuchs is a Terex brand. www.terex-fuchs.com Saw heads Pro Pac PP-22 & PP-24 saw heads are built with the logger in mind. Maximizing productivity while minimizing operating costs. Arm and butt plate geometry are optimized for large or small tree capability while minimizing butt plate wear. Grab arms incorporate a regen circuit to provide faster cycle times while maintaining the holding power of 2 individual cylinders. Supply hoses connected to a sealed bulkhead at rotator center eliminating hose wear and debris build up in the saw head. Heavy duty 360° rotator incorporates 30” bearing and three drive pinions providing superior load distribution and component life. Innovative disc design eliminates the use of large bolts for teeth allowing extra material and smooth transitions at high stress areas providing superior strength and component life, and heavy duty skis & skirt incorporate 3” x 48” heel held with 1” bolts. www.propacindustries.com Improved harvester head Quadco showcased the newly updated Keto 660C harvester head. The 660C comes with a topping saw, this one a 16.5-in model, it relies on the dual track feed system that makes Keto heads unique, applying the full 8,000 lbf of delimbing force to the job at hand. Keto-660C is equipped in view of North American requirements. The head has a fixed track system and an eco-tilt with an integrated rotator. The topping saw, butt search sensor and saw stop function ensure efficient and safe operations. New features include a saw safety sensor that prevents sawing when the operator is in the chain shot zone. www.quadco.com   View the embedded image gallery online at: https://www.woodbusiness.ca/index.php?option=com_k2&Itemid=1&lang=en&layout=latest&view=latest#sigProGalleria78b85c9f86
April 5, 2018 - Caterpillar has announced the launch of two new Cat Forest Machine models, the 548 and the 548 LL. These machine platforms increase profitability for loggers by maximizing efficiency, increasing production, and reducing owning and operating costs. The Cat 548 and 548 LL and other 500 series Forest Machine models meet U.S. EPA Tier 4 Final emission standards and feature outstanding fuel efficiency and optimized work tools while increasing horsepower, swing torque, lift capacity, and tractive effort. Cat Forest Machines are versatile, purpose-built track machines that can be customized to perform a complete range of tasks for forestry operations and contractors. Over the last 20 years they have become the industry standard in many logging applications. The Cat 548 forestry excavator is configured for forestry tasks ranging from road building and site preparation to processing logs roadside or at a landing. The Cat 548 LL is configured as a log loader and can perform log handling tasks, such as shovel logging, loading, power clam/butt-n-top applications, and millyard activities. The 548 and 548 LL provide ultimate machine efficiency coupled with enhanced performance. Cat components, purpose-built upper and lower frames, and application specific linkage configurations increase machine up time and reduce machine operating costs. Enhanced hydraulics aid fuel economy, deliver more power An enhanced hydraulic system delivers a higher level of efficiency and power. Upsized pumps, the layout of components, and back-to-back main control valve all optimize hydraulic oil flow. The result is powerful, multi-functioning hydraulics for strong machine performance, ensuring that work tools function quickly and smoothly to complete work faster with greater fuel economy. The hydraulic updates enable the 548 and 548 LL engine to run at a lower steady state rpm while maximizing power. Operating at a lower rpm provides significant fuel savings and lowers operating costs. At the same time, Tier 4 Final technology and features like a variable pitch fan, variable power modes, automatic engine speed control, one-touch idle, and boom and stick regeneration valves provide excellent fuel economy. With automatic engine speed control, the machines will revert automatically to a lower idle speed when there is a lull in operation. Regeneration valves minimize oil required from the pump, which maximizes efficiency. Swing torque increases almost 20 per cent The 548 and 548 LL are built to perform, powered by a Cat 152 kW (204 hp) C7.1 ACERT engine with increased horsepower that maintains maximum performance under load. Strong hydraulic horsepower allows the 548 and 548 LL to handle a variety of work tools. An almost 20 per cent boost in swing torque, depending on the model, provides more power to move trees, increasing production and efficiency. Heavy lift mode and other updates enable greater lift capacity to handle larger payloads with improved control, and tractive effort has improved by as much as 13 per cent to allow efficient maneuvering when working away from the road. Boom, hydraulic configurations for specific applicationsWith boom arrangements and hydraulic systems for specific applications, the 548 and 548 LL are more optimized and effective at road building, loading, processing, shoveling, or millyard unloading and stacking. New track options meet shovel logging and low ground pressure application requirements, and ground saw hydraulics are available for log loader applications. In addition to the standard cab, a purpose-built processor cab option is available for both machine models, and two premium rear entry cab choices are available for the 548 LL. Cab keeps operator working comfortably, productively The Forest Machine cabs have features and technology to reduce fatigue and keep operators working comfortably and productively all day. An air ride seat, which is fully adjustable, includes heating and cooling capability, and a bi-level air conditioner, heater, and defroster keep the cab at a comfortable temperature in any weather. Other features include a satellite radio, 12-volt power supply socket for charging, a larger monitor, and LED lights. Standard tool control software enables quick, efficient selection and swapping of tools.New rear entry cab options provide convenient access on a fully lit platform through the use of a key fob. For these rear entry cabs, a new cab forward riser and optimized window design improve visibility for shovel logging and other applications, while an innovative cab lock down system increases machine uptime by increasing cab tilt efficiency and minimizing transport time. Easy to access, easy to maintainThe Cat 548 and 548 LL are designed for serviceability. A one-piece engine hood design with two opening angles allows easy access to engine and cooling compartments. The side-by-side engine and hydraulic coolers are convenient for cleaning due to a cooler that hinges out of the way, and fewer cooling fins per inch improves debris flow-through and reduces clogging. Plentiful storage space at ground level allows ready access to tools, equipment, and supplies that operators use daily. Purpose-built durability and reliabilityLike other Cat machines, the 548 and 548 LL are designed and built for reliable, durable performance in the severest of forestry applications. Cooling capability is increased 12 percent for trouble-free operation, and the variable pitch, reversing cooling fan maintains optimum fluid temperature. Validated, proven excavator technologies ensure overall machine reliability.The purpose-built upper frame, high-wide carbody, robust linkage configurations, and heavy-duty enclosures feature thick doubler plates, extra gussets, and other weldments and reinforcements. Upsized 216 mm (8.5 inch) pitch (336 HEX) grease-lubricated tracks provide excellent life in forestry applications. Caterpillar worldwide support Cat Product Link allows for remote location of a machine and tracking of fuel consumption and other indicators. Caterpillar customers are supported by the industry’s largest network of dealers who will keep them and their machines running with parts availability, field services, state-of-the art diagnostic programs, remote monitoring, and more.For more information, contact your nearest Cat dealer or go to www.cat.com/forestry.
April 5, 2018 - The CEO of the BC Forest Safety Council (BCFSC), Rob Moonen, and the president and CEO of FPInnovations, Stéphane Renou, are pleased to announce that the two organizations have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to work collaboratively on enhancing safety performance in the forest industry by sharing leading, innovative scientific and technical applications. Under the MOU, individual projects and financial support agreements for specific activities will be identified through consultation between the two parties, with FPInnovations providing research expertise and non-proprietary technical resources or materials to assist the BCFSC in improving or expanding the support it provides to the forest industry to reduce serious injuries and fatalities.“This MOU supports some of our key strategic objectives, namely to link safety and business success in a meaningful way and to improve the distribution and awareness of industry current best practices, guidelines and standards, while improving collaboration with government agencies and other stakeholders," said Rob Moonen, BC Forest Safety Council CEO. "Promoting innovation, science and technical solutions in support of improving safety in the forestry industry is key to long-term success.” Examples that are currently underway include a steep slope harvesting calculator, feller buncher rollover analysis, fatigue and distraction technologies, a winch-assist harvester best practice manual and body cams for fallers. “This MOU reflects the importance for the forest sector of increasing safety as a key metric of industrial performance and demonstrates the industry’s commitment to seek innovative solutions to managing risks. FPInnovations values this partnership as an opportunity to drive its research and expertise to field practitioners and achieve safer operations for forest workers,” said Stéphane Renou, president and CEO, FPInnovations.
April 3, 2018 - Peterson Pacific Corp., a manufacturer of industry wood grinding and chipping machines has announced the introduction of the new Peterson 3310B drum chipper. “The new-3310B drum chipper is smaller and lighter than our previous model, but still packs impressive performance. The 3310B can operate on even tighter landings for biomass and land clearing operations” said Jody Volner, president of Peterson Pacific Corp. “We are excited about the capabilities of this remarkable machine.” With a 540 hp (402 kW) Tier III or Tier IV Caterpillar engine, the 3310B has the power to handle up to 24-inch (61 cm) diameter logs. With large access doors on both sides of the machine for serviceability, the fully enclosed engine compartment keeps things clean. The 3310B’s transverse design allows for a much smaller operations deck, providing flexible production configurations in diverse terrain. With 230-degrees of rotation, the end-load or optional top-load spout design allows trailers to be loaded in a variety of positions, depending on the demands of the job site. Using the proven drum and knife design from the larger 4300-series drum chippers, the 3310B's main components are robust and offer long life. The 3310B is available with a four-pocket drum for typical biomass chips, or an eight-pocket drum for microchipping applications. The chips exit the machine from an innovative auger system which feeds an accelerator to increase payload density. The 3310B is available with an optional powered feed deck, allowing for shorter stems and tops. Both the powered- and standard fixed feed deck can be stowed for transportation purposes. The Peterson 3310B drum chipper is also Peterson+ enabled--a new remote monitoring solution providing machine owners access to real-time and historical data of their machine’s performance and location.   Peterson specializes in developing delivery and processing equipment that turns low-grade organic materials into high value products.
April 3, 2018 - Project Learning Tree Canada (PLT Canada) will be placing 1,600 youth in green jobs through partnerships with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and the Canadian Parks Council (CPC). PLT Canada has received approximately $11 million in funding from the Canadian federal government to provide the youth with jobs in the summers of 2018 and 2019. “We’re just trying to give youth some professional experience so that they might consider a green job in the future, and hopefully this is just one step in the right direction to be a sustainable leader in the future,” Jessica Kaknevicius, PLT Canada’s project lead on the Green Jobs Initiative tells CFI. Kaknevicius, who also got introduced to forestry through tree-planting in her youth says the passion of the people who work in the sector is what drew her in, combined with being given the chance to explore. “I wasn’t really an outdoors person growing up; I wasn’t really exposed to a lot of nature, but it was because of being given opportunities in green jobs that I ended up pursuing a career in it,” she says. “I think everyone’s dedicated and committed and really loves their job, and that’s something that’s contagious and something that has inspired me to continue in this field.” Kaknevicius encourages interested youth to spend time interacting with those who are working in the field to find out about opportunities that are available. At the end of April, PLT Canada will have a website available with job postings for positions in the program that haven’t been filled yet. Kaknevicius says the goal is to grow forest and conservation leaders by providing students with opportunities and careers in conservation and forest management across the country, as well as provide wage-matching to employers to provide more opportunities for youth to enter into green jobs. Eligible organizations can access the federal funding for a 50 per cent wage-match. Working periods run from May through August and must be for a minimum of eight weeks to a maximum of 16 weeks. Canadian youth aged 15–30 are eligible and must be registered students returning to school, either secondary or post-secondary, according to PLT Canada. The forest sector is being encouraged to participate by applying for green jobs that are applicable in different organizations. “We’ve had lots of organizations across Canada already apply for funding to support positions like silvicultural technicians, forest technicians, wildlife researchers, so there are lots of opportunities for the forest sector that can be supported by this wage-matching program,” Kaknevicius says. “That’s the benefit of working with Project Learning Tree Canada and through SFI is that we’re really reaching out to our network members to provide this opportunity.” Employers can find out if they’re eligible on PLT Canada’s website at pltcanada.org.
March 29, 2018 - On August 24, 1943, the Globe and Mail announced, “the formation of the Ontario Forest Industries Association by a widely representative group of lumber, pulp and paper and associated industries, with the objective of securing better utilization of the great forest resources of Ontario.”
April 25, 2018 - Skeena Sawmills' $10-million modernization plan has been put on hold as a result of weaknesses in old sawmill buildings that were exposed following periods of heavy snowfall last winter.Operations vice-president Roger Keery told the Terrace Standard that the mill is re-engineering its plans and has structural upgrades in mind for the existing sawmill building, which will take place before the mill moves forward with its modernization.“We had some problems with old buildings over the winter,” Keery told the Terrace Standard. “With the snow we had, some of the weaknesses in our older buildings became obvious. Our original plan was to use the existing buildings, but we are rethinking that now.”Read the full article here.
April 18, 2018 - JoeScan, Inc., a market leader in 3D laser scanning technology for the sawmill industry, has announced the hiring of two new employees.
April 17, 2018 - Canadian Forest Industries is once again highlighting innovations in the filing room, from new processes and techniques to new technologies, during File Week 2018 from April 30 to May 4!
April 17, 2018 - The University of New Brunswick Wood Science and Technology Centre and Maritime College of Forest Technology in Fredericton are hosting a three-day Spruce-Pine-Fir Kiln Operator Course from June 12-14.
April 16, 2018 - The Ontario government is investing $1.9 million in upgrades to help modernize White River Forest Products sawmill outside of White River, Ont. The funds will allow the mill to increase production by 30 per cent and support new product development.
April 10, 2018 - Site manager Dave Herzig welcomes CFI to Nechako Lumber and Premium Pellet, companies of Sinclar Group Forest Products, in Vanderhoof, B.C. The site utilizes 100 per cent of the fibre that enters its gates, either as lumber, wood pellets, heat or power.
April 10, 2018 - Last summer, a volunteer group met face-to-face for a workplace risk assessment at Workplace Safety North (WSN) headquarters in North Bay, Ont. Fifteen sawmill industry representatives from management, labour, government, and not-for-profit organizations attended a workshop facilitated by Sujoy Dey, Ph.D., Corporate Risk Officer at the Ministry of Labour (MOL).
April 9, 2018 - Research by FPInnovations has shown that it is possible to automatically separate Canada’s softwood species with a high success rate. The results can boost productivity at the dry kiln.
March 29, 2018 - A self-cleaning camera created by ExcelSense Technologies, a UBC-based venture, has cut maintenance downtime at one of the log lines in a British Columbia sawmill by almost 60 per cent. By providing the ability to see a critical but previously invisible process on the worksite, the technology enabled millworkers to prevent a recurring clogging problem from developing on multiple occasions. “We wanted to offer a reliable, economical solution to an issue faced by many industrial worksites: the inadequate surveillance of key operations because of the absence of cameras or the repeated contamination of existing cameras,” says ExcelSense founder and CEO Nima Nabavi (BASc '05, MASc '06, MECH), PEng. “In most industrial settings, a normal camera would likely need to be cleaned by external means every few minutes.”Owned and operated by Canfor, the BC mill had been dealing with frequent clogs at the outfeed of one of its log lines — an enclosed area where sawdust, oil and pitch would accumulate. If they could see what was happening inside, millworkers would have an opportunity to intervene before a clog developed and damaged equipment or otherwise interrupted production. But due to the constant flow of material into the area, installing regular cameras there would have provided no benefit; their view would have been obstructed in a matter of minutes.[Looking into a sawdust conveyor using ExcelSense’s self-cleaning camera with the self-cleaning function turned off (left) and on (right).] So Canfor, always looking to increase safety and productivity at its sites, agreed to test out the ToughEye: a robust, one-piece self-cleaning camera that ExcelSense claimed would not only supply clear visuals for the lifetime of the unit — about 90,000 cleaning cycles — but also do so without using water, detergents, pumps or compressors. Housed in a heavy-duty metal casing, the camera features a special active mechanism that weakens the bonds between the contaminants and optical surface, allowing it to rid the surface of oil, water, sand, dust, mud and other substances by effectively “blinking” like a human eye.In just the first two weeks of operation, the ToughEye helped mill workers prevent at least three clogs from forming. And by the end of the test period, during which it executed upwards of 17,000 cleaning cycles, it had cut maintenance downtime at the log line from an average of 130 minutes to 53. By eliminating the need to regularly suspend activities and dispatch workers or special equipment to address preventable operational problems or to clean existing cameras, which are often located in dangerous or hard-to-reach places, the ToughEye may not only save valuable resources, but also improve workplace safety conditions.[After four months, an industry-standard lighting device installed next to the ToughEye was damaged to the point of inoperability (left). The ToughEye remained fully functional and essentially unscathed (right).]“When companies are unable to monitor their processes, they’re left with no choice but to react and correct any jams or clogs or other malfunctions after they’ve already caused downtime and, in some cases, equipment damage,” says Nabavi, who studied electro-mechanical engineering at UBC. “This camera would allow them to act before any damage is done.”Nabavi first noticed a need for technology like his while working on machine vision systems for open-pit mining and oil companies, which frequently endured long, expensive periods of downtime for camera maintenance. However, while the ToughEye was designed for use on mining, forestry, oil and gas and other harsh industrial sites, it also has a number of potential non-industrial applications, including the monitoring of trains, infrastructure and remote and unmanned airports.Currently a member of UBC’s on-campus tech incubator, HATCH, ExcelSense has been receiving strong interest from heavy industries seeking to improve their operations using autonomous and tele-operated equipment. The company was given the BC Innovation Council’s Ignite Award in 2017 and its technology was named one of Business in Vancouver’s top 50 innovations of 2017. More information about ExcelSense and the ToughEye is available at:https://www.excelsensetechnologies.comhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dATP6ospmAohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHHfKigYzUk
March 28, 2018 - EACOM Timber Corporation's Timmins sawmill was the stage of a safety celebration Tuesday morning as leadership, staff and production crew gathered at a town hall meeting. Kevin Edgson, EACOM president and chief executive officer, offered a $10,000 cheque to the Threads of Life local committee to support the organization’s flagship event — Steps for Life. This fun, 5km walk aims to educate the community about the devastating ripple effects of a workplace tragedy and how we can work together to prevent others being injured or killed on the job. Manufacturing remains an environment with significant risks associated with workplace safety. “At EACOM, we are committed to providing our employees with a safe work environment, to investing in training and prevention, and to nurturing a collective safety culture. We want everyone to return home to their families healthy at the end of each day,” Edgson said. “This spring, we will be walking in our communities with family, friends and co-workers; and we hope many will join us for such an important and worthy cause.” In April and May, more than 30 communities across the country will host a Steps for Life walk. All proceeds support Threads of Life, a national charitable organization dedicated to helping families to heal after they have been affected by a traumatic workplace fatality, life-altering workplace injury or occupational disease. Threads of Life currently supports more than 2,700 family members from across the country. “Threads of Life with its trained volunteer family guides is able to continue providing wisdom, guidance and peer support to families suffering from workplace injuries with donations such as these,” Jeff Kiezer, registration lead at Threads of Life said. “We hope our contribution will help raise community support for families affected by workplace tragedy, but most importantly, raise awareness about the need for safety to eliminate life-altering workplace injuries, illnesses and deaths,” Edgson said. The public may find information about which cities are holding a Steps for Life walk, sponsor a local team or register by visiting www.stepsforlife.ca.
March 26, 2018 - Sawmillers in Canada today have more technology options to consider than ever before for every aspect of an operation. When it comes to kiln drying, batch systems are the more common choice, but there isn’t one application that fits every sawmillers’ needs. Canadian Forest Industries spoke to three suppliers of continuous dry kilns (CDKs) to offer insight for sawmillers trying to decide what would work best.
March 26, 2018 - My first impression of Fornebu Lumber Company’s single sawmill in northern New Brunswick was awe at its log yard. Heading up the driveway, the mill itself is hidden behind several mountainous decks of 8- and 9-foot sawlogs.
April 25, 2018 - Approval has been granted for Vancouver Island's first mass-timber building to be constructed. The location is in Esquimalt, B.C., which is at the southern tip of Vancouver Island.“This is an innovative project that is going to serve to really bring focus to Esquimalt as a municipality that does innovative and exciting things,” project manager Troy Grant told Victoria News.Upon completion, the 12-storey, 83-unit building will weigh only 25 per cent of a similarly sized concrete and steel building.Read the full article here.
April 25, 2018 - Ontario is investing $7.8 million in research, education and construction of tall wood buildings so more wood products can be used in new homes and taller buildings through the new Mass Timber Program. The use of wood in infrastructure can help address climate change by storing carbon in buildings and by avoiding greenhouse gas pollution associated with other carbon-intensive materials. “Ontario’s Mass Timber Program will help make us a world leader in innovative new wood products and tall wood frame building construction,” Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry Nathalie Des Rosiers. “Our government is committed to moving beyond six-storey structures and through our new centre for innovation, and partnerships with educational institutions here in Ontario, we know we can build a future that is environmentally friendly, innovative and safe.” Ontario's Mass Timber Program has been developed to promote the use of wood in taller buildings by: Providing funding for research and development of innovative wood products, undertaken by academic and private research organizations, to support potential wood-related changes to the Building Code and other standards  Funding post-secondary education institutions to provide skills development and technical training and to create tools relating to using wood in construction Supporting the establishment of a tall wood research institute in Ontario, in partnership with researchers, universities, and colleges Demonstrating the successful use of mass timber in design, construction, and the fire safety of taller wooden buildings (seven storeys and higher) including four tall wood demonstration projects. “In 2012 I introduced a Private Member’s Bill to allow for six-storey wood frame construction in Ontario, and this was adopted into the Building Code in 2015,” said Bill Mauro, Minister of Municipal Affairs. “The expanded use of this sustainable resource in the construction industry is important for northern Ontario’s economy, and compliments the work my ministry is doing on how we can allow for tall wood buildings higher than six storeys to be built in the province.” In 2015, Ontario made changes to its Building Code related to the use of wood-frame construction in mid-rise construction of up to six storeys. Numerous projects have been designed and built to these new Building Code requirements and more are coming. In addition to environmental benefits, mass timber structures will have lower building costs due to quicker construction times, while maintaining fire safety standards.
April 10, 2018 - A 12-storey building inherently different than any other in the city will soon rise on Toronto’s eastern waterfront.
March 23, 2018 - On the picturesque shores of Vancouver Island, in the city limits of Nanaimo, B.C., a veneer and roundwood facility has been efficiently turning 100 per cent Douglas fir into quality veneer sheets since 1988.
March 15, 2018 - Norbord Inc. announced today that a shortage of wood will cause it to temporarily suspend production at its oriented strand board (OSB) mill in 100 Mile House, British Columbia.  Norbord currently expects the suspension to commence on or about May 14, 2018 and to continue for approximately one month.The significant wildfires that the province of British Columbia experienced in the summer of 2017 seriously damaged logging areas surrounding the 100 Mile House mill.  Further, the severe weather conditions this winter have limited loggers' ability to access the forests during the months when the mill typically builds its annual log inventory. Combined, these extraordinary circumstances have impacted Norbord's ability to secure a sufficient wood supply to operate the mill on a continuous basis during this one-month period.Norbord will continue to supply its customers with production from its other OSB mills and the 100 Mile House mill will continue to receive log deliveries during this period. The Company currently estimates that the curtailment will negatively impact its second quarter 2018 financial results by approximately US$5 million.The 100 Mile House mill has a stated annual production capacity of 440 million square feet (3/8-inch basis).
March 6, 2018 - Oregon-based Roseburg Forest Products recently reached an agreement in principle with Pembroke MDF, Inc. to purchase Pembroke’s medium density fiberboard (MDF) and molding production facilities located in northeastern Ontario, Canada. Upon final due diligence and board of director approval, the parties expect the sale to close by April 9, 2018. The acquisition will be Roseburg’s first international purchase and will continue the company’s expansion throughout North America. Roseburg is currently building an engineered wood products plant in Chester, S.C., and recently acquired 158,000 acres of timberland in Virginia and North Carolina. “The Pembroke plant and its employees present untapped potential that can be used to better serve existing and future customers of our innovative and versatile MDF product line,” said Mark Avery, Roseburg senior vice-president of industrial products and national accounts. “It’s an exciting opportunity for Roseburg to move into the northeastern region and further diversify our operations and meet demand.” Roseburg currently owns and operates an MDF plant in Medford, Ore., which produces the company’s Arreis, Medite, Medex, Permacore and Fibrlite product lines. “The addition of the Pembroke MDF plant means Roseburg customers will have access to a broader portfolio of products from a company with a demonstrated, long-term commitment to the industry,” said Jim Buffington, Roseburg’s business director for industrial products. “While this deal represents an excellent strategic opportunity for the company, it also offers Pembroke employees and suppliers the promise of stability and consistency provided by Roseburg’s large manufacturing enterprise,” Roseburg president and CEO Grady Mulbery said. “This is a win-win for everyone involved, and we look forward to what the future will bring.” Founded in 1936, Roseburg Forest Products is a privately owned company and one of North America’s leading producers of particleboard, medium density fiberboard and thermally fused laminates. Roseburg also manufactures softwood and hardwood plywood, lumber, LVL and I-joists. The company owns and sustainably manages more than 600,000 acres of timberland in Oregon, North Carolina and Virginia, as well as an export wood chip terminal facility in Coos Bay, Ore. Roseburg products are shipped throughout North America and the Pacific Rim. To learn more about the company please visit www.Roseburg.com.
Feb. 6, 2018 – Quebec-based Arbec Forest Products has received an additional investment of up to $1 million to support its $10-million upgrade of its oriented strand board (OSB) plant in Miramichi, N.B. The investment, by the New Brunswick government will go toward ensuring new equipment and technology is used to increase productivity and quality control. “We have enormous confidence in the skills of our workforce here in Miramichi and we hope that the more than $10-million worth of capital investments we are making speak to that very clearly,” mill manager Les Flett said in a statement. Arbec purchased the Miramichi plant in 2011 and began production in 2012 following renovations. The company currently employs 124.
Jan. 16, 2018 - CFI takes you inside Coastland Wood Industries' veneer and roundwood mill in Nanaimo, B.C., where they process 100 per cent Coastal Douglas fir.
Jan. 5, 2018 - Terrace House, the highly anticipated development by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Shigeru Ban, with its highest point sitting at 232 feet above ground level, has received official approval to use exposed mass timber in the top seven storeys of this 19-storey building.  The issuance of the Building Permit required approval of an “Alternative Solution” to demonstrate compliance with Vancouver’s Building Code, thereby allowing the use of mass timber in the construction of a high-rise building.  This approval from the Chief Building Official’s Office is significant as Terrace House is the tallest hybrid wood structure approved for construction in North America.“As an engineer, it is imperative not only that I trust my own work, but that my work receives rigorous review and confirmation by others, including peer reviewers and competent authorities having jurisdiction, such as the City of Vancouver,” said Andrew Harmsworth, lead fire engineer and building code consultant from GHL Consultants Ltd.Prior to the official approval of Terrace House, the use of exposed mass timber in a hybrid wood structure of this height had never been permitted in either Canada or the United States. While there has been much discussion of the environmental benefits of tall mass timber buildings, few exceeding 6-storeys have been permitted or constructed. The recently completed Brock Commons, an 18-storey student residence at the University of British Columbia, was permitted only as an exception to the B.C. Building Code and the acceptance was based in part on covering all the timber with fire-rated gypsum wallboard.The approval is a milestone for Terrace House and the City of Vancouver. It was achieved through a process of performance-based fire and structural engineering tests supported by analysis of fire risks including risk of fire after earthquake. Tests demonstrated to the City and the expert peer reviewers that this hybrid mass timber building is as safe, if not safer, than a conventional concrete or steel high-rise. The approval is a major step forward in Vancouver's goal of being the Greenest City in Canada. Wood is a sustainable and versatile building material that stores, rather than emits, carbon dioxide for the life of the structure and beyond. The environmental and performance benefits of wood construction include reduced greenhouse gas emissions, reduced embodied energy, renewable benefits, and direct occupant and builder health benefits. For Shigeru Ban Architects, wood is valued for many of these reasons, and particularly for its economy, tactile qualities and performance attributes.Terrace House has advanced tall wood construction in Canada through its use of exposed mass timber not only as a structural, environmentally sustainable element, but also as an integral interior finish within a residential market high-rise.
Dec. 12, 2017 - Babcock & Wilcox MEGTEC (B&W MEGTEC), a subsidiary of Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises, Inc., has announced it has been chosen by Louisiana-Pacific Corporation(LP) to install a B&W MEGTEC CleanSwitch regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) system at its OSB plant in Hanceville, Ala. The new RTO system has a rated design flow of 330,000 ACFM and will handle the off-gas from five bark-fired rotary drum dryers. This is the fourth LP plant to install a CleanSwitch system. Engineering is currently underway, and delivery is scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2017, with projected startup set for of the first quarter of 2018. “The CleanSwitch RTO features a two-chamber, single-valve design that allows customers to achieve environmental compliance,” said RodneySchwartz, vice president-global sales, B&W MEGTEC. “The system features a single, patented switch valve, which minimizes maintenance and virtually eliminates pressure spikes associated with valve changes for better overall dryer control and energy efficiency. “Additionally, our process knowledge associated with ceramics engineering allows us to supply a heat-recovery bed tailored to the wood products industry. This maximizes thermal efficiency and minimizes bed maintenance for improved uptime performance.” The CleanSwitch unit is being manufactured at B&W MEGTEC’s facility in De Pere, Wis. The LP Hanceville operation has the capacity to produce 410 million square feet of oriented strand board (OSB) on a 3/8-inch basis, comprised largely of softwood furnish. About B&W MEGTEC Babcock & Wilcox MEGTEC, a subsidiary of Babcock & Wilcox, designs, engineers, manufactures and services sophisticated air pollution control systems, and coating and drying equipment for the industrial sector. About B&W Headquartered in Charlotte, N.C., Babcock & Wilcox is a global leader in energy and environmental technologies and services for the power and industrial markets, and has been transforming our world for 150 years. B&W companies employ approximately 5,000 people worldwide. Follow us on Twitter @BabcockWilcox and learn more at www.babcock.com.   About L-P Louisiana-Pacific Corporation is a leading manufacturer of quality engineered wood building materials including OSB, structural framing products, and exterior siding for use in residential, industrial and light commercial construction. From manufacturing facilities in the U.S., Canada, Chile and Brazil, LP products are sold to builders and homeowners through building materials distributors and dealers and retail home centers. Founded in 1973, LP is headquartered in Nashville, Tenn. and traded on the New York Stock Exchange under LPX. For more information, visit www.lpcorp.com.
Dec. 5, 2017 - An intense orange light frequently glows in Quebec’s Northern Lac Saint-Jean skies – a sign of industrial development. But unlike the forestry or aluminum development the region is used to, this time the glow is all about cucumbers.
Oct. 24, 2017 - Henco Viljoen, co-owner of Timbersoft in South Africa, is passionate about timber drying. He inherited this passion from his father, mentor, and co-partner, Johan Viljoen. Together they have developed customized drying systems for fine tuning, improving, and upgrading kilns. The result? Their client sawmills in South Africa are now generating greater productivity, higher quality products, and increased profits. “Our main business is optimizing the drying process,” says the younger Viljoen, who works from Sedgefield in the Garden Route section of the Western Cape. “Our strong suit is my father’s 50+ years hands-on knowledge, not only of drying, but the sawmilling industry as a whole, and my 20-year wood technology/IT automation background.” When Johan retired from milling in 2005, he decided to use his hands-on approach in helping other mills to improve their kiln drying. But he quickly discovered a problem – mills were now very technology driven, using computers, PLC and SCADA interfaces. He soon realized that processes happen behind the scenes in software code that he had no control over. This is where Henco got involved. With his IT knowledge, the Viljoens installed their first PLC/SCADA based kiln controller in late 2005. Installations and upgrades followed at regular intervals. The client base grew, and by 2013 Henco joined Timbersoft on a full-time basis after a career in IT and automation. In 2013, Henco started a small research project where he combined solar and heat pump technologies with their PLC and SCADA system to dry hardwoods “smokeless without a boiler.” The kiln dried Eucalyptus boards, which normally dry in four weeks, dried in less than two weeks. This technology opened up many more advancements, including the development of smoke/boiler free drying and ISPM15 heat treatment systems. “It also allowed me to make an in-depth study of the drying process, dynamics, and controls, enabling me to really improve our drying system by leaps and bounds. We used Johan’s vent cycle approach and developed a dynamic, self-adjusting schedule. “Although not yet 100% foolproof, we are very close. The system keeps improving. The goal is to leave the operator with only a start button…the program does the rest and stops at target moisture content (MC%). The operator won’t have to make any decisions,” Viljoen remarks. Since Henco joined the company full time, the business has grown by more than 300 percent and is still growing. Kilns running their system are currently drying about 300,000 cubic meters annually and are expected to increase to 400,000 cubic meters by the end of 2017. Measuring Moisture Moisture measurement is an integral link in the drying management chain -- and forms part of Timbersoft’s Process control. For that very important reason, Timbersoft relies upon moisture measurement. Viljoen says a moisture meter in the hands of a kiln operator is like a calculator or Excel spreadsheet in the hands of an accountant. Neither can go without it. Viljoen personally uses a Wagner L606 handheld meter to measure moisture in the kilns because of its speed, accuracy, dependability, consistency, and ease of use. Many of his clients use Wagner’s MMC220, L612 and L622 models, and the L722 stack probe for exactly these reasons. “The Wagner brand is very big in South Africa sawmilling with good reason. If you think capacitance moisture meter, Wagner is the first name that comes to mind. Even in student literature used by Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University’s Wood Technology course, the Wagner is used as an example of a capacitance meter,” Viljoen says. “You don’t hear of a Wagner meter that just stopped working,” he adds. While in-kiln moisture meters are important in achieving excellent results, Viljoen believes that MC alone should not be used as the only guide to where the schedule should be. However, for stopping at a desired final MC, it cannot be beaten. “The way the moisture evaporation rate in the timber reacts to a set point should be taken into consideration. This can be seen by observing how your vents react to a set point, but only when preparation, process control, and maintenance remain constant. “If you have the in-kiln moisture measuring facility AND you know how to interpret all the information your kiln controller is giving you, then you are on the road to becoming the best kiln operator a boss could ask for,” Viljoen declares. Photos by Tony Morgan, Wagner Meters. Photos by Tony Morgan, Wagner Meters.   View the embedded image gallery online at: https://www.woodbusiness.ca/index.php?option=com_k2&Itemid=1&lang=en&layout=latest&view=latest#sigProGalleriace882e14ec High-Tech Advisory Because the Viljoen team is highly knowledgeable about using technology to dry timber, Timbersoft has achieved exceptional success. However, he cautions that operators who do not know how to interpret the information provided by high-tech systems can block improvements. “A kiln operator should be more skilled than just able to see the dry bulb is running low (call the boiler room), or the wet bulb is running high (fix water issue/check probe), or the in-kiln target MC% is reached (pull the timber),” he declares. The new high-tech systems have made kiln drying more graphic, and for a good operator with a clear understanding of these systems, it should be considerably easier. But for operators who lack this understanding, Viljoen says the ease of changing multiple variables can and has been catastrophic. “Kiln operators who use high-tech systems should never make more changes to a schedule than what they can accurately identify the outcome of,” he remarks. “Make a study of your kiln controller. Don’t just accept everything it presents you with. Try to figure out the logic it’s applying. More often than not, the programmer has no idea what kiln drying is about. The same applies to the kiln expert – he/she often has very little idea what programming is about. The operator needs to ask questions because the more he knows and understands, the more he’ll realize how little he knew when he started,” he adds. Kiln Drying Management Viljoen says there are five points of drying management. If one of the first three changes, then the schedule optimization is affected. The first three points include preparation, process control, and maintenance. Preparation involves sawing accuracy, board dimension, and stacking procedures. Process Control involves airflow, energy distribution and management, humidity control, and venting. While maintenance involves electrical, mechanical, instrumentation, and structure. “When any of those three changes, it affects the dynamics of the kiln. This affects the rate at which moisture leaves the timber – meaning that the MC is not yet where it’s supposed to be at that stage in drying. “A MC-based schedule is more forgiving, as it is supposed to only progress to the next stage of drying when a certain MC is reached. A standard time-based schedule, however, won’t know what to do. This is why it’s of utmost importance that a kiln operator spots these abnormalities on the process graph and have the authority to stop the kiln and have it fixed,” Viljoen says. Achieving Higher Profitability Quality control is essential for production yield and profitability. And one of the key factors in a good quality control program is moisture management. Inaccurate readings can lead to delays, low yields, and poor grade inspections. That’s why Timbersoft considers kiln moisture monitoring, using the Wagner moisture meters, to be part of their overall success. Timbersoft has many successful client case studies as proof of its customized approach to kiln moisture management. Learn more at www.tskilns.co.za. And, learn more about Wagner’s wood moisture measurement solutions at https://www.wagnermeters.com. Tony Morgan is a senior technician for Wagner Meters, where he serves on a team for product testing, development, and also customer service and training for moisture measurement products. Along with 19 years field experience for a number of electronics companies, Tony holds a B.A. in Management and his AAS in Electronics Technology. Call Wagner Meters today at (800) 634-9961 and ask for Tony, or visit www.wagnermeters.com.
March 13, 2018 - Pinnacle and West Fraser have begun the conversion of an existing particle board facility in Smithers, B.C., to a wood pellet production facility.The project under the Smithers Pellet Limited Partnership will be co-owned by West Fraser Timber Co. (30 per cent) and Pinnacle (70 per cent).Located in northwestern B.C. approximately halfway between Prince George and Prince Rupert, the Smithers facility is connected by direct rail to Pinnacle’s Westview Port Terminal in Prince Rupert.The plant will have an annual capacity of 125,000 metric tonnes, with production expected to begin in the third quarter of 2018.Both fibre supply and customer off-take agreements are in place under long-term agreements, the company reports. “We are pleased to be partnering on the Smithers facility redevelopment with West Fraser. This project will contribute to the economic vitality and job growth of Smithers and other local communities,” Robert McCurdy, CEO of Pinnacle, said in a news release. “We are committed to the numerous communities throughout the Western Canadian fibre basket in which we operate, and we plan to continue to look for similar projects to support our future growth.”Pinnacle currently operates six industrial wood pellet production facilities and a port terminal in B.C., and, in addition to the Smithers operation, has a new production facility under construction in Entwistle, Alta.
Feb. 27, 2018 - Eric Savics and Danny Hagge established Van Urban Timber to produce live-edge slabs and custom wood furniture from locally salvaged urban trees in Vancouver, B.C. “Van Urban Timber started with a theory and an idea that came from Danny [Hagge]," Savics says. "He had a theory that there were enough urban trees coming down on a daily basis that could sustain enough fibre to run a small timber business. What we would do, is provide a free service to go and pick up these trees whether they were coming down for reasons of liability, aesthetic, development, what have you.” “When we started Van Urban Timber we were excited because we were doing something people weren’t doing in the city," Hagge says. "We were taking green waste and turning it into something no one was producing in Vancouver. I think that is the backbone of our company. No matter what, we are always going to strive to be recycling, reusing, and I think that’s the way of the future. Renewable is definitely the way.” 
Feb. 27, 2018 - Lincoln Dobson is in the search, rescue and recycling business. He searches for old growth forest timber used in building construction, rescues them from the demolition scrap heap, and recycles the douglas fir, western larch, spruce, and pine beams into new timber frame buildings, lumber products, and even heirloom-quality bed frames. By harvesting the industrial forest in this way, Lincoln’s Buena Vista, Sask.,-based business, Last Mountain Timber Wrighting and Recycling, helps to preserve existing old growth forests while providing some of the soundest, richly-textured, appearance grade wood available for new construction. “After high school, I started tree planting in Western Canada and could see the logging clear cuts, which disturbed me,” Lincoln says. “I have a love of nature and wondered what I could do to help the forest in addition to planting trees.” Besides tree planting, Lincoln also spent years working for a timber framing company in British Columbia, where he acquired the mortise and tenon joinery skills needed to build hand-crafted timber frame structures. His inspiration for rescuing and recycling wood was ignited when his father, who was in the building demolition business, informed him that many old wooden grain elevators scattered throughout the rural countryside were being demolished. When he returned to Buena Vista, Lincoln’s desire to save forests along with his sawmilling and carpentry skills enabled him to launch Last Mountain Timber. Throughout the past 20 years, the company has rescued more than 1.6 million board feet of timber from demolished buildings. The old growth beams have typically been in structural building components anywhere from 40 to 110 years, with some beams measuring as large as 12” X 16” up to 24’ long. The company either salvages the timbers themselves or purchases them from elsewhere as they become available. Last Mountain Timber’s best industrial timber resource has been old wooden grain elevators slated for demolition. For many years, the business was extremely busy rescuing high quality, old growth wood commonly used in these structures. “There were some summers when I was getting a grain elevator each week and dealing with five or six demolition companies,” Lincoln says. “Now it is in its twilight.”To this point, the company has salvaged timber from 205 grain elevators, but Dobson says that similar to old growth forests, it is becoming harder and harder to find industrial timbers from demolition projects, as many grain storage silos have transitioned to cement construction. This year, there were only three elevator demolition projects and that will likely be the last of them. In the meantime, the company’s customers keep a keen eye for demolition projects where beams could be rescued and let Lincoln know when they become available. While harvesting the industrial forest is an important part of Dobson’s business, what happens to the old growth timber after they are rescued is how the company makes a profit. The timbers are sometimes used in new timber frame construction, but more often, the surfaces on the square beams are carefully sawn to remove the grey exterior appearance acquired over time to reveal their natural inner beauty. The timbers are then custom-sawn into a variety of wood dimensions to meet customer requirements. Recently, they installed a 12” X 14” timber measuring 20’ long and a couple of 12” X 14” posts at the entrance to the Jiffy Lube headquarters building in Edmonton, Alta. They have also supplied material for a Montana’s restaurant in Saskatoon, Sask. While they have done business throughout Canada and the United States, their sales and projects these days are a lot closer to home. The key component to the sawmilling side of their business is a Wood-Mizer LT40 band sawmill with a 12’ bed extension. This allows the company to custom saw timbers up to 33’ long. While there was no question that Lincoln was going to purchase a Wood-Mizer sawmill because of his past positive experience using the equipment, he says it was important to properly power the unit to deal with harder wood material like recycled douglas fir. “I was definitely looking for a diesel. I get so much more power and so much more fuel efficiency with it,” Lincoln says. “I knew that I was going to be a professional about running my business, and so I chose the Wood-Mizer LT40 because it was a heavier duty unit. I can definitely count on it. The sawmill is durable and dollar for dollar, it’s probably some of the best money I’ve ever spent.” Recently, Lincoln upgraded to using Wood-Mizer RazorTip carbide tipped blades for remanufacturing purposes on abrasive timber. The material produced on the band sawmill has numerous uses in homes, cabins, lodges, commercial structures, home additions, garages, barns, gazebos and covered residential decks. “When we put a timber on there, it could be for a set of stairs, a table, a bed or a bar top,” Lincoln says, depending on the cut list to fill orders. The company also manufactures truss and roof systems, residential and commercial flooring, mouldings, baseboards, and casings. The material from the band sawmill could also be components for the supply and construction of engineered and handcrafted mortise and tenon timber frame buildings that Last Mountain Timber offers as part of its diverse product line. To complement his Wood-Mizer sawmill, Lincoln uses a Wood-Mizer EG200 twin blade board edger primarily to conserve and edge grey jacket boards generated from the first cut on the bandsaw mill. These boards are aesthetically pleasing material for feature walls or as headboards on bed frames. Most recently, Lincoln purchased a Wood-Mizer BMS250 blade sharpener and BMT150 tooth setter. “It’s working really well because the system is able to do a better job than the two guys I was sending my blades to for sharpening,” Lincoln says. He says that he likes that Wood-Mizer offers many options to grow as needed with all their equipment. With industrial old growth forest timber becoming harder to find, Last Mountain Timber has made the transition to also marketing green and first-cut wood, which includes processing raw logs, sawing other wood species like birch, and salvaging local downed trees that might have ended up in the landfill or burned as firewood. Lincoln concludes that he depends on and uses his Wood-Mizer equipment every day and his business wouldn’t be where it is today without it.
Feb. 26, 2018 - Located in the small community of Haute-Aboujagane in the southeastern part of New Brunswick is the family-owned and operated G.L. Wood Products. Established in 1985, the value-added remanufacturing company produces a variety of wood products including wooden boxes, pallets, stickers & laths, and dunnage. “The main line is buying lumber at a certain price that we remanufacture and sell for a higher price,” said Guy Donelle, operations manager at G.L. Wood Products. “Over the years, we have diversified and grown our company from 5 seasonal employees to over 40 yearly employees.”G.L. Wood Products is situated a few miles west of the Atlantic Ocean where the local economy relies heavily on the fish and wood products industries. The company capitalizes on both markets and first came into business by primarily processing wooden boxes for shipping fish domestically as well as to the northeastern United States, Haiti, Dominican Republic, and Iceland. G.L. produces various sized boxes for smoked herring, cod, halibut, oysters, potatoes, berries, and boned salt ranging from five pound to 300 pound capacities. Donelle said the industry prefers wooden boxes compared to cardboard or waxed curtain cardboard boxes because clients generally reuse the quality wood for another purpose, especially in countries such as Haiti and the Dominican. Wooden boxes produced by G.L. were originally processed by double arbor circular saw blades, but the business had issues with the product consistency and quality. In 1995, G.L. purchased a six-head horizontal resaw manufactured by Wood-Mizer in order to increase their efficiency from the thin-kerf bandsaw blades it utilized.“It changed the company,” Donelle said. “Because of the thin-kerf, we increased 20 per cent of our production by getting an extra piece from each 2 x 6.”After buying heat treated dry spruce 2 x 6 lumber, the multi-head resaw splits the boards horizontally in half to get two ends of the wooden box. For the box sides, bottom, and cover, another 2 x 6 board is split into five pieces through one complete pass on the six-head resaw. Once the correct size of box pieces are prepared and custom printing of a company’s name and product description is added, the pieces ship to the customer unassembled which saves on shipping costs and cargo space. According to Donelle, the operation became more efficient when running their equipment at an optimal speed to process up to 28,000 board feet during each nine hour work shift. For more than 20 years with the same resaw, the company has processed six million board feet of dry spruce annually which is equal to more than one million wooden boxes produced for the seafood shipping and packaging industry each year.Along with the success of wooden boxes, diversification of products has been pivotal for the growth of the business. Although the Atlantic provinces are not considered to be a large manufacturing sector, in 1996 G.L. identified a market to produce and sell wooden pallets for the industry.“We have grown the business by selling to fisheries, peat moss companies and also the manufacturing sector,” Donelle said. “We build a lot of custom pallets both softwood and hardwood and have over 60 different types of pallets from stringer, block, and wing pallets.”Although pallet production is supplemental to the primary wooden box business, the company produces more than 300,000 pallets per year for companies throughout Eastern Canada and the United States.In 2005, G.L. further diversified and added a second Wood-Mizer six-head resaw to begin producing kiln stickers and laths for local sawmills in the area.“The [Wood-Mizer] multi-head resaw gives us the kerf and the precision needed for making these products,” Donelle said. “With the durability and service we were getting from Wood-Mizer, we didn’t hesitate in buying a second multi-head and didn’t even quote the competition.”For manufacturing the stickers and laths, G.L. takes a 2 x 6 piece and passes it through the six-head resaw vertically to produce stickers. “That’s why we bought the second multi-head,” Donelle explained. “Because we can get seven boards off the 2 x 6 in one pass.” Almost nothing goes to waste in the operation as byproducts prove profitable as well with the selling of kindling from below-grade kiln stickers along with shavings and sawdust sold to local farmers. The scheduled management of their bandsaw blades has also proved beneficial by sharpening each blade as many as six times instead of throwing them away at the first signs of dullness.“Instead of using a blade and run it until it breaks, we change the blades every half day,” Donelle said. “By doing that we save a lot on the downtime because you seldom see blades break during production.”G.L. depends on Wood-Mizer blade sharpeners and tooth setters to maintain the performance of their own blades on-site and has been using Wood-Mizer bandsaw blades for the past several years.Today, G.L. is making wooden boxes more than ever, but has now diversified into additional wood products and markets to establish a sound blueprint for sustained success. Throughout decades of lucrative operations, Donelle said their accomplishments have come from employing good people and treating them as family. “You really have to surround yourself with good people. When you have good employees and good suppliers and good customers, you’re building all the right bridges and it keeps business simpler. Our employees are ultimately important to our business and our overall key to success.”
Feb. 9, 2018 – Natural wood has been used to build structures for centuries, but it has its limitations. Even after pre-treatment, temperature changes like extreme heat can make wood expand causing it to weaken.A team of scientists at the University of Maryland came up with a two-step process to help natural wood overcome those barriers since it is a cheap and preferred building material all over the world. Their solution involves the partial removal of lignin and hemicellulose from the natural wood followed by hot-pressing to completely densify the natural wood and increase its strength tenfold. “Our processed wood has a specific strength higher than that of most structural metals and alloys, making it a low-cost, high-performance, lightweight alternative,” the scientists wrote in their academic article published in the science journal Nature.
Jan. 2, 2018 - Alberta forest products company Millar Western Forest Products Ltd. announced that it is continuing to execute its growth strategy through the acquisition of Spruceland Millworks Inc. Millar Western has acquired all shares of the company, its manufacturing operations in Acheson, Alta., and its woodlands assets. The transaction brings together two companies that have enjoyed a productive business relationship for decades.Spruceland Millworks is a value-added manufacturer and international distributor of high quality SPF wood products. Started in 1982 by Ben Sawatzky with a simple table saw and a second-hand forklift, the company today has grown to become a "go-to" supplier for its customers and trusted employer in the region. Its more than 100 highly-skilled employees operate a 130,000-square foot manufacturing facility in Acheson.  "For the past 35 years, Spruceland Millworks has been a leader in Alberta's value-added wood products sector, developing new products and building new markets in Canada, the U.S. and overseas," said Craig Armstrong, president and chief executive officer of Millar Western. "Through most of those years, Millar Western has been Spruceland's largest supplier of raw material.  We look forward to working in even closer partnership with Spruceland leadership to continue the advancement of this dynamic business." This transaction will strengthen Millar Western by integrating the company's existing sawmill operations with Spruceland's value-added manufacturing capabilities. Operating as a division of Millar Western, Spruceland will continue to work under its existing, proven management team and highly-regarded brand.  "Alberta forest companies have a reputation as progressive, responsible and innovative," said Tim Fazio, managing partner and co-founder of Atlas Holdings, which entered into partnership with Millar Western in May 2017, becoming majority shareholder.  "We are excited about the prospects for growth and expansion within the province's forest sector, led by proven companies like Millar Western and Spruceland." Ben Sawatzky, Spruceland Millworks chief executive officer, commented that the two companies share a family-business background and a common approach to management. "With their long history in Alberta, strong core values, proven ability in sustainable forest management, commitment to the value-added sector and reputation as a good employer, Millar Western is ideally suited to assist Spruceland in its next phase of growth. I am especially pleased that this strategic alliance will ensure a strong future for Spruceland's dedicated staff and security of supply for our valued customers." Headquartered in Edmonton, Millar Western is a century-old, Alberta-based forest products company that produces SPF and aspen lumber, pulp and bioenergy at facilities in Whitecourt and Fox Creek. Established in 1982 and based in Acheson, Spruceland uses SPF dimension lumber to produce value-added wood products including decking, studs, furring strips and industrial access mats. Combined, Millar Western and Spruceland employ nearly 700 people on a full-time basis, and hundreds more on contract.
Nov. 3, 2017 - Stella-Jones Inc. (TSX:SJ) ("Stella-Jones" or the "Company") today announced financial results for its third quarter ended September 30, 2017. "Stella-Jones' growing reach in the utility pole and residential lumber markets led to solid sales growth in these product categories during the third quarter, more than offsetting the effect of lower year-over-year pricing in the railway tie product category. Furthermore, a strong operating cash flow generation allowed us to significantly reduce our long-term debt and positions us for future expansion," said Brian McManus, President and Chief Executive Officer.  Financial highlights (in millions of Canadian dollars, except per share data) Quarters ended Sept. 30, Nine-months ended Sept. 30, 2017 2016 2017 2016 Sales 517.6 512.6 1,508.8 1,496.6 Operating income 63.1 67.3 178.4 205.1 Net income for the period 42.0 45.7 116.8 135.4   Per share - basic and diluted ($) 0.61 0.66 1.68 1.96 Weighted average shares outstanding (basic, in '000s) 69,330 69,255 69,319 69,200           THIRD QUARTER RESULTS Sales reached $517.6 million, up 1.0% from $512.6 million last year. Acquisitions contributed sales of approximately $2.1 million, while the conversion effect from fluctuations in the value of the Canadian dollar, Stella-Jones' reporting currency, versus the U.S. dollar, had a negative impact of $9.9 million on the value of U.S. dollar denominated sales. Excluding these factors, sales increased by $12.9 million, or 2.5%. Railway tie sales amounted to $160.8 million, compared with sales of $186.6 million in last year's third quarter. Excluding the currency conversion effect, railway tie sales declined approximately $21.7 million, or 11.6%, mainly due to lower pricing. Utility pole sales reached $172.5 million in the third quarter of 2017, representing a 7.8% increase over sales of $160.0 million a year ago. Excluding the contribution from acquisitions and the currency conversion effect, sales increased approximately $14.4 million, or 9.0%, reflecting organic sales growth in the southeastern United States and a gradual return to historical maintenance demand. Sales in the residential lumber category reached $125.8 million in the third quarter of 2017, up from $107.3 million a year earlier. Excluding the currency conversion effect, residential lumber sales increased approximately $20.2 million, or 18.8%, mainly reflecting higher selling prices due to increased untreated lumber costs and more favourable weather in Canada during the third quarter of 2017 compared to the same period last year. Industrial product sales reached $25.6 million in the third quarter of 2017, down from $27.5 million in the third quarter of 2016. This variation is mainly due to lower sales of marine pilings in Canada, partially offset by higher sales of rail-related products in the United States. Logs and lumber sales totalled $32.9 million, versus $31.3 million in the third quarter of 2016. This variation reflects the timing of lumber purchase and resale activities, the timing of timber harvesting, as well as higher selling prices due to increased lumber costs. Operating income stood at $63.1 million, or 12.2% of sales, compared with $67.3 million, or 13.1% of sales in the third quarter of the previous year. The decrease as a percentage of sales essentially reflects lower selling prices for railway ties and a less favourable geographical mix in the utility pole category. Net income for the third quarter of 2017 was $42.0 million, or $0.61 per diluted share, versus $45.7 million, or $0.66 per diluted share, in the third quarter of 2016. NINE-MONTH RESULTS For the nine-month period ended September 30, 2017, sales amounted to $1.51 billion, versus $1.50 billion for the corresponding period a year earlier. Acquisitions contributed sales of $40.9 million, while the currency conversion effect had a negative impact of $4.3 million on the value of U.S. dollar denominated sales. Excluding these factors, sales decreased approximately $24.4 million, or 1.6%. Operating income reached $178.4 million, or 11.8% of sales, compared with $205.1 million, or 13.7% of sales, last year. Net income totalled $116.8 million, or $1.68 per diluted share, versus $135.4 million, or $1.96 per diluted share, in the prior year. SOLID FINANCIAL POSITION As at September 30, 2017, the Company's financial position remained solid with long-term debt, including the current portion, of $454.1 million, down significantly from $615.8 million three months earlier. The decrease in long-term debt reflects a solid operating cash flow generation during the quarter and, to a lesser extent, the effect of local currency translation on U.S. dollar denominated long-term debt. As at September 30, 2017, Stella-Jones' total debt to total capitalization ratio was 0.30:1, down from 0.37:1 three months earlier. QUARTERLY DIVIDEND OF $0.11 PER SHARE On November 2, 2017, the Board of Directors declared a quarterly dividend of $0.11 per common share payable on December 21, 2017 to shareholders of record at the close of business on December 4, 2017. OUTLOOK "Based on current trends, we expect to conclude 2017 with slightly higher sales compared to the previous year. Looking ahead to 2018, conditions prevailing in the railway tie category should yield relatively stable sales. Meanwhile, normal maintenance patterns and improving demand for transmission poles should provide further momentum in the utility pole category. We also expect margins to slightly improve throughout 2018. Our focus remains on growing shareholder value by maximizing operating cash flow through ensuring efficient and cost- effective operations. Funds generated will be invested in working capital and our existing network, while maintaining an optimal dividend policy and examining expansion opportunities that offer strategic value in our main product categories," concluded Mr. McManus. CONFERENCE CALL Stella-Jones will hold a conference call to discuss these results on November 3, 2017, at 10:00 AM Eastern Time. Interested parties can join the call by dialing 1-647-788-4922 (Toronto or overseas) or 1-877-223-4471 (elsewhere in North America). Parties unable to call in at this time may access a recording by calling 1-800-585-8367 and entering the passcode 83494502. This recording will be available on Friday, November 3, 2017 as of 1:00 PM Eastern Time until 11:59 PM Eastern Time on Friday, November 10, 2017. NON-IFRS FINANCIAL MEASURES Operating income is a financial measure not prescribed by IFRS and is not likely to be comparable to similar measures presented by other issuers. Management considers this non-IFRS measure to be useful information to assist knowledgeable investors regarding the Company's financial condition and results of operations as it provides an additional measure of its performance. ABOUT STELLA-JONES Stella-Jones Inc. (TSX:SJ) is a leading producer and marketer of pressure treated wood products. The Company supplies North America's railroad operators with railway ties and timbers, and the continent's electrical utilities and telecommunication companies with utility poles. Stella-Jones also manufactures and distributes residential lumber and accessories to retailers for outdoor applications, as well as industrial products for construction and marine applications. The Company's common shares are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange. Except for historical information provided herein, this press release may contain information and statements of a forward-looking nature concerning the future performance of the Company. These statements are based on suppositions and uncertainties as well as on management's best possible evaluation of future events. Such factors may include, without excluding other considerations, fluctuations in quarterly results, evolution in customer demand for the Company's products and services, the impact of price pressures exerted by competitors, the ability of the Company to raise the capital required for acquisitions, and general market trends or economic changes. As a result, readers are advised that actual results may differ from expected results.
Oct. 27, 2017 - Over the past few years, the lumber industry has been confronted with chip production above and beyond the demand, resulting in the creation of big surpluses in various regions of Quebec and Ontario. This situation may well get worse in the coming years, as pulp and paper mills—which used to be large consumers of this resource—buy less and less chips or if there is a substantial increase in production. At the same time, the wood panel manufacturing industry is facing a certain number of challenges relating to the constant supply of raw materials, and particularly with regard to the quantity and quality of the materials.To meet the needs of panel manufacturers that want to diversify their sources of supply as well as respond to the necessity of finding new markets for sawmill residues, FPInnovations has launched a new project aimed at evaluating innovative fragmentation technologies adapted to sawmills that convert small diameter logs for the production of by-products to be used in manufacturing structural and non-structural panels. Within this project, FPInnovations’ Engineered Wood Products Manufacturing team shipped to a European company already using the fragmentation technology sawmill residues in the form of slab wood, trim ends and cull logs from various species and in a variety of shapes and diameters. FPInnovations will evaluate the possibility of fragmenting these logs that are unfit for being processed into lumber in order to use them to make wood wafers of desired dimensions for panel board mills.Thanks to this new approach, wood wafers produced in sawmills may be delivered to panel manufacturers and used directly as raw materials, without any subsequent processing. In addition to offering new opportunities, this approach will help improve the mechanical and physical properties of the panels, while cutting the production costs, through a decrease in the density of the panels and a reduction in the amount of resin-based binder required.This development project aims to offer companies producing wood chips a way of increasing revenue from non-traditional markets. For more information, contact 
Aug. 14, 2017 - The owner of Precision Custom Remanufacturing in west Abbotsford, B.C., is crediting firefighters for preventing a fire that broke out on the property last week from destroying a $1.2-million thermal kiln. 
Aug. 10, 2017 - The low Canadian dollar as well as acquisitions helped Stella-Jones post a sales increase of 5.5 per cent from last year's number in Q2. 
Aug. 3, 2017 - Litco International, Inc. announces the publication of a new white paper: A Comparison of Pallet Strength and Functionality. The 12-page white paper, authored by Dr. Marshall White, provides detailed analysis comparing Litco's Inca molded pallets to GMA-style, new and repaired, traditional nailed wood pallets for one-way shipping.
July 18, 2017 - Hardwoods Distribution Inc., through its subsidiary Rugby Holdings LLC, has purchased substantially all of the assets and assumed certain liabilities of Downes & Reader Hardwood Company Inc. for a total value of US$6.0 million.

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