Harvesting

Sept. 11, 2017 - A 90-year-old logging outfit on Vancouver Island is closing up shop this year for good. The owner of W.D. Moore Logging says slim margins for small players are to blame.
Aug. 22, 2017 - Exhibit space is selling fast for the 2018 Atlantic Heavy Equipment Show. Even though the event isn’t until April 5th and 6th, the show floor is now over 80 per cent sold out! Elbow-room only crowds are expected on both days of the region’s most comprehensive heavy equipment show at the Moncton Coliseum Complex, so don’t miss a chance to be part of this huge industry event.
Aug. 15, 2017 - As with any of Canada’s forest products companies, family-owned Teal-Jones Group is accustomed to facing challenges with steely resilience. In spite of the media storm around the U.S. duties, Teal’s pressing concern these days is about shrinking fibre supply in British Columbia. Reductions in allowable annual cut are occurring or are expected this year in Quesnel, Prince George, and Lakes timber supply areas.
Aug. 11, 2017 - If you’re a logging contractor or licensee, how do you know if your employees are qualified to do their job? How do you train a new employee and make sure they have all the information and skills to be able to be productive and safe in their position?
Aug. 8, 2017 - With 15 years of experience under his belt as an excavator operator working to build forest roads, Michael Lavoie was ready to be his own boss in 2012. But where would he find the $400,000 needed to buy two excavators to start his own road-building business? The 38-year-old knew he would be hard-pressed to count on banks, which can be somewhat reluctant when you start talking about forestry.
Aug. 2, 2017 - Mother Nature is a tough competitor. And for 65-year old B.C. logging outfit Squamish Mills operating in the Sea to Sky region between Pemberton and Squamish, she’s their biggest rival.
Oct. 12, 2017 - The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) launched an ambitious new initiative on Wednesday to increase the use of materials from responsibly managed forests. The Vancouver Declaration allows businesses which use these natural products to pledge their commitment to increase responsible sourcing. Global companies like IKEA, H&M, SIG, Marks and Spencer, Jysk, Mitsubishi Paper Mills or Fuji Xerox have pledged support to the initiative. The aim is to get more businesses across the entire supply chain on board."It's fantastic to see so many great businesses supporting this declaration," said the FSC's director general Kim Carstensen. "Our forests are a wonderful yet delicate natural resource, and a lot of people's lives depend of their sustainable and responsible use. By committing to using FSC-certified wood and forest products, our partners are helping to protect our forests – and the planet – for future generations."IKEA's global forestry manager Mikhail Tarasov said, "IKEA is committed to only use wood from more sustainable sources (currently FSC certified and recycled) by 2020 and promote sustainable forest management beyond our own needs to make it an industry norm. This is what we call 'forest positive.' So it was natural for us to support the Vancouver Declaration. We're proud to be part of this global initiative." The Vancouver Declaration is part of FSC's wider ambition to help businesses meet the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. President and general manager of SIG, Samuel Sigrist, presented the initiative at FSC's 2017 General Assembly. "We believe that this initiative, with its commitment to FSC certification, is a key tool in achieving parts of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals," he said. "We are the first in our industry to be able to display the FSC label on 100 per cent of our packs. This is a major milestone for SIG on its journey to become a 'net positive' business, helping to create more natural resources than we use."
Oct. 6, 2017 - Encouraging the long-term use of wood in Canada's construction industry will help us achieve our climate change goals while increasing the demand for Canadian wood products and creating good, middle-class jobs for Canadians. Canada's Minister of Natural Resources, Jim Carr, announced on Friday the launch of a new mass timber program, Green Construction Through Wood (GCWood). It is aimed at encouraging the long-term use of wood in non-traditional construction projects, such as tall buildings, as part of the government's efforts to position Canada as a leader in the global low-carbon economy.  The program launch follows the government's budget 2017 announcement of $39.8 million over four years, starting in April 2018, to undertake this initiative. "By investing in this innovative program, we can help reduce GHG emissions while creating jobs for Canadians and opportunities for Canadian businesses,” said Minister Carr. “We are also helping position Canada as a world leader in a low-carbon global economy." Wood-based materials, over their life cycle, use less energy and emit fewer greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants than traditional, energy-intensive materials. Using them will reduce the overall carbon footprint of most buildings, helping Canada reach its 2030 climate change target and support its long-term commitments under the Paris Agreement. With this new funding, GCWood will build on the past successes of the Tall Wood Building Demonstration Initiative (TWBDI), which resulted in the construction of the world's tallest hybrid wood building at 18 storeys, the Brock Commons Tallwood House at the University of British Columbia. It will also facilitate revisions to the 2020 and 2025 National Building Code of Canada to allow tall wood buildings beyond the current limit of six storeys, up to 12 storeys and even taller, and help develop design and costing tools to assist designers and builders.    The formal call for Expressions of Interest for the program, which focuses on tall wood building projects (10 storeys and above), is now open and accepting applications, which are due by Dec. 6, 2017.
Sept. 29, 2017 - The Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (SFI) announced Thursday that J.D. Irving (JDI) is the 2017 winner of the SFI Leadership in Conservation Award. This award, announced at the SFI Annual Conference, recognizes SFI Program Participants across Canada and the U.S. who are involved in strong partnerships focused on conservation. In 2016, SFI Program Participants reported on 420 different audited research projects with more than 500 unique partner organizations. JDI collaborated in 68 forest research projects, the highest number of any SFI Program Participant. Project highlights include JDI's award-winning Unique Areas Program, which has grown from 29 sites in the 1980s to more than 1,300 today. The program focuses on protecting unique elements in working forests. The sites are found and mapped by over 100 forestry professionals working in Maine, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The program has four broad objectives: preserving rare and uncommon species and landscape features; monitoring important indicator species; establishing a database of species and natural features; and engaging the public and stakeholders. JDI has provided instrumental leadership as a founder of the Collaboration for Atlantic Salmon Tomorrow (CAST). CAST is a partnership of scientists, environmental groups and industry participants focused on saving wild Atlantic salmon. Today 11 scientists are at work on four projects using the best technology to count, save and grow wild Atlantic salmon populations. JDI is supporting a large study of white-tailed deer through collaboration with six scientists as well as partners in government across New Brunswick and Maine. The deer research is using GPS tracking and extremely accurate forest inventory mapping to look at how deer are using different forest types during summer and winter months. This long-term study will monitor 140 deer and the habitats they choose over the next four years. J.D. Irving, Limited has also partnered with Natural Resources Canada, Carleton University, and Environment and Climate Change Canada on a five-year songbird habitat research project on JDI land in Northern New Brunswick. Researchers are collecting songbird data with auto-acoustic recording devices. During the breeding season in May and June of 2016, 323 sites were monitored across 17 different forest types. The recordings are being analyzed to determine the variety of songbirds present at specific GPS locations. Researchers also have access to JDI's enhanced, high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) mapping of the entire forest study area to build habitat models individual species that can be projected across the entire forest. Over 500 hours of expert listening to the recordings is being conducted with first‑year results to be completed in early 2017. Monitoring and analysis of breeding data will continue for several years and form the basis for ongoing monitoring, especially in light of climate change. "We appreciate this recognition by SFI," said Jim Irving, co-CEO of J.D. Irving, Limited. "This award is a real tribute to our woodlands team, and the many partners with whom we are proud to work with on research and conservation initiatives. These voluntary investments in science and conservation are a cornerstone of our sustainability commitment and have been part of the way we do business for over 30 years." The SFI community is committed to supporting forest research. SFI requires participants to support research to improve forest health, conservation understanding, productivity and sustainable management of forest resources. "J.D. Irving stands out as a research leader that engages universities and conservation partners year after year. As Canada marks its 150th anniversary we are pleased to recognize J.D. Irving, Limited, whose roots in forestry go back 135 years," said Kathy Abusow, president and CEO of SFI Inc. JDI invests $1.5 million annually in forest research. This investment continues to guide best practices on the ground. On average, 12 graduate students and assistants are engaged in research every year on lands owned or managed by JDI. Much of this research is conducted in collaboration with universities, and it seeks to build knowledge that JDI and other forest managers can integrate into adaptive forest management plans that account for species at risk, water quality, wildlife and climate change. JDI also supports projects funded in part by SFI Conservation Grants. A research partnership with Bird Studies Canada received SFI grant funding to facilitate the monitoring of endangered and threatened bird species, including the piping plover and Bicknell's thrush, on JDI and adjacent government lands. Another project received SFI grant funding to help FPInnovations work with JDI on continuous improvement of harvesting techniques. FPInnovations is a non-profit forest research institute with partners across Canada.
Sept. 27, 2017 – Tree planting charity, Tree Canada is celebrating its 25th anniversary on National Tree Day Wednesday by planting its 82 millionth tree in Canada. Over the past 20 years, Tree Canada has engaged communities, governments, corporations and individuals in the pursuit of a greener and healthier living environment, and provides Canadians with education, technical expertise, and resources to plant and care for urban and rural trees. In the midst of its most impactful year to date, in 2017, Tree Canada announced a more than $1 million investment to restore the forests destroyed by the devastating Fort McMurray wildfires last year. "Growing in size every year, National Tree Day helps remind Canadians of the importance of trees — how they beautify our communities, naturally cool our cities in the summer, and combat climate change, and help improve human health," said Michael Rosen, president of Tree Canada. "As Tree Canada celebrates our 25th year of growing greener, healthier places for Canadians to live, we look forward to 25 more years of playing a leading role in the preservation of Canada's  urban forest across the country."    As the largest urban forest organization in the country, Tree Canada also celebrated the 150th anniversary of Confederation with 150 tree-planting initiatives in communities in every province and territory across the country. Tree Canada has been a driving force behind the establishment of a National Tree Day in Canada. It falls on the third week of September, which is recognized as National Forest Week across the country. Until October 1st, Canadians can take The National Tree Day Challenge at nationaltreeday.ca for their chance to win a trip to Banff, Alta. "Throughout Canada's  history, our trees and forests have helped to define us as a nation and shape us as a people. On this day – National Tree Day – I would like to commend Tree Canada for the remarkable work they have done for 25 years to promote our nation's forests,” said Minister of Natural Resources Canada Jim Carr. On National Tree Day, Tree Canada will mark its 25th anniversary with a ceremonial tree planting near the Bytown Museum at 1 Canal Lane, just below Parliament Hill. The event gets under way at 12:15 p.m. and will feature special guests including The Honourable Jim Carr, Minister of Natural Resources, The Honourable Joyce Murray, MP Vancouver Quadra and Ottawa City Councillor Catherine McKenney.
Sept. 26, 2017 - This year, Festival of Forestry took a group of 20 school teachers out into the forest to learn about sustainable forest management, and ways to educate their students about B.C.’s forests.Watch the video above.
Sept. 26, 2017 – Members of the Alberta Forest Products Association (AFPA) planted 80 million coniferous tree seedlings in forests throughout the province in 2017. This means that for every Albertan, 19 trees were planted during this year’s spring and summer planting season.  "Our association is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year," said AFPA president and chief executive officer Paul Whittaker. “Planting trees is an important part of our past and our future. In many areas, forest companies are now harvesting trees that were planted by pioneers in the industry several generations ago. By planting today, we are ensuring sustainable forests for future generations of Albertans.”  Honourable Oneil Carlier, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry, congratulated the association on their commitment to healthy forests. “Eighty million trees is an impressive feat. Our government is committed to working with AFPA members to maintain healthy forests that create jobs and provide a place for recreation and cultural activities. I am very proud to say that Alberta has some of the most sustainably managed forests in the world.”In additional to promoting environmental sustainability, tree planting is also good for Alberta’s economy. Tree planters, who are often youth and post-secondary students, worked 40,500 person days in 2017. Other sectors, including tree nurseries, equipment suppliers, environmental consultants, restaurants, and hotels also benefit from tree planting activity.The AFPA is celebrating its 75th Anniversary this week at the Association’s Annual General Meeting and Conference in Jasper. In addition, Canada’s National Forest Week runs from September 24-31.      More information can be found on the website.The Alberta Forest Products Association is a private, non-profit industry organization, representing lumber, panelboard, pulp and paper, and secondary manufacturing wood products companies operating in Alberta. AFPA member companies are active participants in sustainability advancements that contribute economic, environmental, and social benefits for Albertans. 
June 19, 2017 - According to research published in the Southern Journal of Applied Forestry 35(4), using in-forest weighing scales can boost the payload efficiency of log trucks.
June 1, 2017 - John Deere is launching a longed-for global first at Elmia Wood. The company has now developed its crane-tip control for harvesters too. There will also be the opportunity to test operate several forest machines plus do tests on simulators at the John Deere stand. “Visitors can try out the new technology during the fair,” says Dieter Reinisch of John Deere. Crane-tip control for forest machines is a true Elmia Wood innovation, which has been developed over the past three fairs. John Deere presented the concept with the help of a forwarder simulator in 2009, which contractors could test and comment on. At Elmia Wood 2013 it was time for the world premiere of forwarders with crane-tip control, which has become a much-appreciated function. “Our customers say they move an extra load every shift thanks to crane-tip control,” Reinisch says. And now it’s time for what the industry has been talking about for ten years: crane-tip control for harvesters. This world first is being presented at Elmia Wood, installed in a John Deere 1270 harvester. Visitors to the fair can test the function both in reality and on simulators. John Deere is also presenting an updated version of its crane-tip control for harvesters. The innovations are in the software, which means that contractors who already have the function on their forwarders can obtain the innovations at their next service opportunity. All of John Deere’s machine models will be exhibited at the fair, including the three new mid-size forwarders in the G series: the 1110G, 1210G and 1510G. Also being shown is the first harvester in the G series, the 1170G with eight wheels. It is a smaller-size machine with a broad range of uses from thinning to easier final felling. One recurring request at previous fairs has been for the opportunity to test operate the machines. This wish will now be granted. John Deere is offering the chance to test operate its forwarders with a rotating and levelling cab. This function is almost standard in the Nordic markets but elsewhere contractors often choose a fixed cab for cost reasons. “At Elmia Wood they have the chance to experience the added value of a rotating and levelling cab,” Reinisch says.  Elmia Wood 7-10 June Elmia Wood is the world’s leading forestry fair and is held every four years outdoors in the forest south of Jönköping, Sweden. The last Elmia Wood (2013) had over 500 exhibitors and 50,000 visitors from around the world and was monitored by the international trade press. On 7–10 June 2017 the global forest industry will gather once more.
May 26, 2017 - Forestry tires are expensive. Take some simple, common-sense precautions to protect your investment and get the most service life and maximum safety out of your tires.Forestry-duty rubber tires are a big investment for logging operators. A set of tires for a four-wheeled skidder can cost upwards of $12,000 USD and fl otation or dual tires can be even more expensive. Skidders, forwarders and drive-to-tree feller bunchers all operate in the most extreme off road conditions of heat, cold, mud, rocks and abrasive soil. Rubber tires can wear prematurely (or fail catastrophically) if not properly looked after. Fortunately, by taking some simple, common-sense precautions, operators can protect their investment and get the most service life and maximum safety out of their tires.First and foremost, operators need to be checking their tire pressure regularly – preferably on a daily or at least weekly basis. Under infl ation can cause excessive heat buildup leading to damage to the sidewall, beads or lining. On the other hand, an over infl ated tire is more vulnerable to impact damage. Always check the tire pressure against the Tigercat and tire manufacturers’ service recommendations.When using band tracks (on bogie axle machines) tire pressure should be set to the maximum recommended pressure. This prevents the tires from squatting too much under heavy loads which can strain and damage the tire sidewalls against the side members of the band tracks. This also helps prevent the tires from spinning on the wheels and damaging their sealing beads. (Note – traction aids should only be used on Tigercat skidders with pre-approval from Tigercat Customer Service to ensure warranty coverage.)Operator training and behavior are also both critical to extending tire life. Two particular areas that operators need to be aware of are the use of differential locks and planning for the best driving path.Differential locks provide extra traction by forcing both wheels on a vehicle to spin at the same speed rather than allowing each wheel to spin at different speeds depending on traction. Pre-emptive use of differential locks in difficult terrain (muddy, steep or dusty) helps to minimize the amount of wheel spin. Many operators wait until they notice wheel spin before using the differential locks. This can lead to severe tire damage as large pieces of rubber can be sheared off if the tire makes contact with a sharp rock or stump when spinning. Differential locks should be engaged in anticipation of difficult terrain as much as possible to minimize this risk, but should be left off for driving on less challenging terrain.Finally, operators need to select the best driving path whenever possible. Operators need to be aware of the geography in the working area and carefully plan the route to be driven. How steep are the slopes? Are there areas or deep mud or hard-to-spot hollows? Going around an obstacle or mound or steep incline may take a little longer, but the savings in fuel and tire damage may well make it worthwhile. Always keep both eyes and your mind open when driving off road. Read more at www.tigercat.com. 
Feb. 10, 2017 - Nine-axle logging trucks, including tandem-drive and tridem-drive configurations, are now approved and in use on a key transportation route in the Vanderhoof area in north-central British Columbia. The approval was the culmination of a four-year collaborative effort between FPInnovations, the B.C. Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure (MoTI), the B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO), and the forest industry.
Jan. 5, 2017 - Forestry and off-road equipment operators and maintenance technicians are used to dealing with obvious dangers from spinning saws and falling tree limbs, but may be less familiar with a critical danger that can cause crippling injuries or death – high-pressure injection injuries.
Dec. 12, 2016 - Fuel quality is critical to keep Tier 4 engines running smoothly, and the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) has released a downloadable infographic to help equipment owners and users keep their machines up and running. The AEM “Get CLEAN on Fuel” infographic outlines five key actions that help protect Tier 4 engines “because while the new engines reduce diesel emissions and protect our health and the environment, the fact is they are rather finicky about fuel,” said William “Bernie” Bernhard, AEM technical and safety services manager. Bernhard explained that today’s Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) is very different from the diesel of just a few years ago. “Among other things, it is subject to change and contamination as it moves from the refinery to the engine, making storage, temperature, age and filtration, and related factors critical in maintaining fuel quality,” said Bernhard. AEM member company experts came together through the association to develop the guidelines as a way to spread more awareness of the importance of diesel fuel quality. 5 Steps to Maintain Fuel Quality The new AEM fuel-quality infographic relays 5 quick tips using the CLEAN acronym, accompanied by actionable guidelines: C - Commit to understanding your T4 engine L - Learn the facts about today’s fuel E - Evaluate your fuel source and fuel handling A - Always follow manufacturer guidelines N - Never take your role for granted Download the complete infographic at aem.org/clean.
Oct. 17, 2017 – FAE group has just released the SCL/EX/VT stump cutter. It has been deigned for excavators from 7 to 15 tonnes. This new stump cutter includes a larger, heavy-duty disk to make stump removal easier. It has been designed to easily remove stumps even when using small and medium-sized excavators. The SCL/EX/VT has a flow rate of 100-160 litres a minute and 26-42 gallons a minute. FAE says the unit is compact, high performing and is equipped with a hydraulic mulching door to control the exit of debris. The equipment is also available with an optional front fixed thumb to move material that has been previously cut. Other options include a customized setting hydraulic motor, diverter valve, a customized attachment bracket, and a customized attachment bracket with fixed thumb. An adjustable supporting service stand is included for storing the machine when it is not in use. Visit FAE’s website for more information.
Oct. 17, 2017 - As bulk handling equipment suppliers continue to make use of new and evolving technologies to develop “smarter” conveyor systems, Martin Engineering has introduced data tracking with QR codes on its belt cleaners and other components.Customers benefit from regularly-scheduled inspections by factory-trained and MSHA-certified technicians, providing operators with easy access to a wealth of data on the application, operating environment, service life and condition of conveyor components, updated on every belt cleaner maintenance visit. By avoiding the common “run it until it breaks” approach to conveyor maintenance, a Martin Engineering proprietary smart phone app gives technicians and customers a tool that helps maximize performance and service life – while minimizing carryback and spillage – to improve safety and reduce unscheduled downtime.Currently being implemented in select markets around the world, the new tracking program captures a wide array of information to create a detailed record on all components. Date codes are imprinted on the blades during manufacture – very important for urethane because it has a limited shelf life – and technicians also affix tags on existing equipment to begin monitoring condition and recording observations.Conceived as part of Martin Engineering’s factory-direct ‘Mr. Blade’ program, technicians perform regularly-scheduled inspections and adjustments, with an 18-point operational assessment from head pulley to tail pulley and a report for each visit. The visual inspections include the condition of pulleys, belts and idlers, as well as belt tracking, sealing, support and containment. This constant vigilance contributes to greater safety, efficiency and dependability of the conveyor systems, minimizing hazards and unplanned outages.“Periodic reviews often reveal developing problems before they become a failure, such as worn idlers, leaking seals or excessive spillage,” explained Chris Schmelzer, Director of the Wear Components Business Group for Martin Engineering.“The data tracking program will help us work with our customers to make better-informed decisions about what equipment to use in specific applications, more accurately predicting the expected wear life,” said Schmelzer. “The goal is to help ensure that all components are properly serviced and replaced during scheduled outages, before a major breakdown occurs and stops production.”With the new tagging and capture ability, component data can be recorded and analyzed in much greater detail than ever before. Every inspection a technician makes will be logged in, along with operational factors such as the material being handled, conveyor speed and remaining wear life, as well as visual observations and other info. The overall goal is to deliver more effective control of bulk material, improving predictive maintenance scheduling and contributing to a lower total cost of ownership.The tagging program allows the company to maintain detailed information about the product’s date of manufacture, installation and service history, giving customers access to the data through a smart phone or other device. “Eventually we will have enough data points to make more accurate predictions about the performance and wear life of individual blade designs and materials of construction under specific operating conditions,” Schmelzer said. “Defining average wear life is extremely difficult because of the number of variables, but having this information will allow us to compare blade performance in similar applications and come up with a range and standard deviation.”Data tracking and analysis have been in use by manufacturers of sophisticated equipment for several years, but the new program developed by Martin Engineering is believed to be the first of its kind for conveyor components. The company already has plans to expand the asset tagging program to its air cannons and other equipment over time.Martin Engineering is a global innovator in the bulk material handling industry, developing new solutions to common problems and participating in industry organizations to improve safety and productivity. The company’s series of Foundations books (available free online) is an internationally-recognized resource for safety, maintenance and operations training – with an estimated 10,000 copies in circulation around the world – and employees take an active part in ASME, SME, VDI, CMA and CEMA. The company also played a pivotal role in writing and producing the 7th edition of the CEMA reference book, Belt Conveyors for Bulk Materials. Martin Engineering products, sales, service and training are available from factory-owned business units in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Spain, South Africa, Turkey and the UK. For more information, contact us at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or visit www.martin-eng.com, or call (800) 544-2947.
Oct. 16, 2017 - Rotochopper’s 2017 Demo Day featured the introduction of the RotoLink 2nd generation remote monitoring system with live connection to the grinder controller and Rotochopper customer service.Work in real-time with Rotochopper Customer Support to view machine settings and troubleshoot issues. Using RotoLink multiple users can work together through live connection on smartphones or computers to monitor and adjust critical machine settings from anywhere in the world. Monitoring capabilities include maintenance life, vibration and bearing temperatures, engine data and production data. When granted access, factory service techs have a direct connection to the display and with permission can change machine settings.Operators set up email and/or text message alarms to alert multiple users immediately when a fault alarm occurs. Alarms can be customized by user depending on individual operational roles.Easily connect RotoLink and your grinder through cell modem, ethernet or Wi-Fi. Data logged during operation and diagnostics is available to machine owners for the life of the machine. “For owners, this means more uptime and predictive maintenance, by allowing them to monitor critical machine parts like the engine and rotor,” said Doug (Spike) Meyer, director of customer service. Customers can choose to receive weekly or monthly reports of their machine health.RotoLink is available for both diesel and electric horizontal grinders. Use RotoLink remote monitoring system to troubleshoot and maximize machine performance.Headquartered in St. Martin, MN, Rotochopper manufactures industrial wood waste grinding equipment including horizontal grinders, slow speed shredders and mobile baggers. http://www.rotochopper.com/
Oct. 13, 2017 - John Deere SmartGrade is now available on the 650K crawler dozer, joining the 700K, 750K and 850K models equipped with the technology. The integrated Topcon 3D-MC2 Grade Control System improves job site accuracy and work quality — delivering precise grading performance while eliminating vulnerable external masts and cables.“The John Deere lineup of SmartGrade dozers are generating buzz in the industry, and many customers were vocal about their need for a smaller dozer with the integrated grade control technology,” said Andrew Kahler, product marketing manager, John Deere WorkSight. “The introduction of the 650K SmartGrade answers those calls with all the same features and benefits as its larger dozer siblings. Customers also asked for multiple track configurations on all SmartGrade offerings, and we answered with the availability of low ground pressure (LGP) or the extra long track (XLT) configurations on all four models.” The 650K SmartGrade boasts a 104 horsepower (78 kW) EPA Final Tier 4 John Deere engine. The model’s cab-forward designs make visibility, safety, and precise grading a priority. Exclusive Total Machine Control comes standard with this model, providing customers with personalization options and optimal comfort. Since SmartGrade is integrated into the machines, it removes the need to install blade-mounted sensors and components daily, reducing setup time and allowing operators to get to work. Eliminating external cables to the masts reduces breakage, and the removal of the masts from the blade eliminates vulnerability to damage and theft. The Auto SmartGrade feature, which is ideal for novice and expert operators alike, identifies the soil type and easily adjusts the machine to new terrain, without operators having to adjust the blades manually. Operators can easily select the application type (grading, cutting, spreading), load setting (high, medium, low) and soil conditions (hard, packed, loose). This feature stops slippage before it occurs by automatically lifting the blade. It also reduces the number of passes required to complete a job, reducing the wear of the undercarriage over time. John Deere dozers equipped with SmartGrade technology are approximately seven per cent more accurate, than those with conventional masted systems. All SmartGrade machines are now available in LGP or XLT track configurations. The LGP configuration is ideal for customers who operate on low ground pressure conditions, such as damp or wet terrains, or on a steep slope. LGP models contain a wider than usual track gauge that provides excellent stability and blade control for light grading jobs. In contrast, the XLT configuration is best for rocky terrains and can withstand heavier loads. Fleet managers looking to get the most out of their SmartGrade dozers can rely on their John Deere dealers to provide Ultimate Uptime, featuring John Deere WorkSight. With Ultimate Uptime, owners receive predelivery and follow-up inspections that include five years of JDLink telematics, machine health prognostics, remote diagnostics, programming capabilities and the ability to add dealer-provided uptime solutions to create a customized package. For additional information and model-specific specifications, visit www.JohnDeere.com or contact your local dealer for a demo.
Oct. 5, 2017 - Attendees at the recent Great Lakes Logging and Heavy Equipment Expo in Escanaba, Mich., had the opportunity to participate in the Barko Strong-Arm Skill Challenge.
Oct. 3, 2017 - John Deere has announced the latest addition to its forwarder lineup, the 1910G Forwarder. The largest model in the John Deere forwarder line, the 1910G offers operators the power and efficiency needed to tackle tough jobs, even on difficult terrain. The 1910G machines are equipped with a Final Tier 4 200kW/268 horsepower engine. The maximum engine output has increased by 7.5 per cent and torque by 21 per cent compared to previous models, offering customers the power and performance they expect in a John Deere machine. Additionally, the drive hydraulics have been increased, with the transmission boasting 4.5 per cent more tractive force. “The G-Series Forwarder line provides our customers with the machines they need to tackle each workday, regardless of the conditions they may face. With our 1910G machines, operators are able to handle even larger loads,” said Niko Solopuro, product marketing manager of WCTL Forwarders and Automation. “Additionally, we maintained the features of the G-Series lines that our customers appreciate — including the improved operator station and configurable joystick controls — to develop a machine that customers enjoy while also boosting operator productivity.” A key feature on this model is the adaptive driveline control, a first in the forestry industry. This software-based control system improves the productivity and drivability of this G-Series forwarder, and enables the operator to choose the desired RPM setting (Eco, Normal, Power) for the operating conditions. The system automatically adjusts the engine’s RPMs to correspond with the engine load. In high-load situations, the driveline control ensures that the diesel engine runs smoothly and uses the maximum available tractive force efficiently. Another key feature is the larger load capacity. The cross-sectional area of the wide load space is bigger and the new-generation headboard provides excellent visibility to the load space. Additionally, the CF8 boom on the 1910G moves smoothly and seamlessly, increasing accuracy and efficiency. Boom control is further enhanced using Intelligent Boom Control (IBC). Exclusive to John Deere, IBC is an innovative technology that improves operator productivity by automatically controlling the lift, slew and extension of the boom based on the location of the grapple. IBC increases accuracy and, ultimately, the number of loads per each work shift. Additionally, configurable joystick controls allow the dealer to quickly reconfigure the machine to meet the preference of the operator. The operator can select one of three configuration options, providing the operator with an intuitive system. The 1910G, as well as the rest of the G-Series Forwarder line, is equipped with the TimberMatic F-16 control system. The improved control system features a configurable user interface, cruise control and inclination display, increasing operator efficiency. Additionally, the new software offers service personnel remote access to the machine. New MECA control modules, simple CAN busses and a streamlined electrical system improve the efficiency of machine functions. The 1910G is available with two cab options, fixed or rotating and leveling, both of which are designed to improve operator comfort. The rotating and leveling cabin helps the driver to maintain the correct working positions to reduce strain on the back and shoulder areas, even when working on uneven terrain. With a cabin rotation of 290 degrees, the 1910G model offers a view of the boom and grapple, enabling safer, easier log loading. The large windows of the cab allow for virtually unrestricted all-around visibility. Other fatigue-beating features, including ergonomic armrests, a fully adjustable air-cushioned seat and an automated climate-control system, help to boost operator productivity.  All John Deere forwarders come standard with JDLink in base for five years. JDLink, the proven John Deere telematics solution, remotely connects owners and managers with their equipment and local John Deere dealer. Through JDLink, they have access to alerts and machine information, including performance and maintenance data, allowing them to better manage where and how equipment is being used, even from miles away. To learn more about the 1910G Forwarder, as well as the rest of the John Deere forwarder line, visit your local John Deere Forestry dealer or www.deere.com/forwarders.

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