Harvesting

Aug. 15, 2017 - As with any of Canada’s forest products companies, family-owned Teal-Jones Group is accustomed to facing challenges with steely resilience. In spite of the media storm around the U.S. duties, Teal’s pressing concern these days is about shrinking fibre supply in British Columbia. Reductions in allowable annual cut are occurring or are expected this year in Quesnel, Prince George, and Lakes timber supply areas.
Aug. 11, 2017 - If you’re a logging contractor or licensee, how do you know if your employees are qualified to do their job? How do you train a new employee and make sure they have all the information and skills to be able to be productive and safe in their position?
Aug. 8, 2017 - With 15 years of experience under his belt as an excavator operator working to build forest roads, Michael Lavoie was ready to be his own boss in 2012. But where would he find the $400,000 needed to buy two excavators to start his own road-building business? The 38-year-old knew he would be hard-pressed to count on banks, which can be somewhat reluctant when you start talking about forestry.
Aug. 2, 2017 - Mother Nature is a tough competitor. And for 65-year old B.C. logging outfit Squamish Mills operating in the Sea to Sky region between Pemberton and Squamish, she’s their biggest rival.
July 14, 2017 - FPInnovations has created two best practices videos for building and maintaining high-performance resource roads. The videos tackle road drainage and roadside brushing techniques. Find both here. 
July 13, 2017 - Although a negotiated agreement could bring an end to the softwood lumber dispute in the coming months, the Canadian Federation of Woodlot Owners (CFWO) would like to remind everyone that it is imperative that an exemption for roundwood from private forests be included in any future softwood lumber agreement between Canada and the United States.
Aug. 16, 2017 - After a year of operation in Burns Lake, B.C., the Chinook Community Forest is being hailed as a success for the community and shareholders.
July 31, 2017 - The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Canada, the leading independent certifier of forest management practices, is pleased the federal government has issued a draft action plan to support Canada's boreal caribou population, but believes the plan must do more to encourage better responsible forest management practices as a vital element to protecting caribou and other species at risk.FSC Canada will consider submitting formal comments on the plan as part of the government's public consultation process, issued on July 27, 2017."Plans to help species at risk, such as the woodland caribou, cannot be made in isolation to the overall needs for responsible management of our forests," said François Dufresne, president of FSC Canada. "We need to ensure more of our forests are managed to the standards that not only protect wildlife but do so while also meeting our economic, social and environmental needs, as well as those of Indigenous Peoples for generations to come. The revised new FSC standards for Canada have been developed to achieve just that."FSC Canada is concerned with the recent report by the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) that documents how Canada is lagging behind in meeting its commitments under the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity. FSC believes that current forest management practices hinder Canada meeting biodiversity targets set for 2020.Roughly 20 per cent, representing 55 million hectares, of the managed forest area in Canada is FSC certified. But irresponsible forestry can be a major threat. If all of that activity was required to meet FSC standards, that risk would be greatly mitigated, including protecting species at risk such as woodland caribou and the rights of aboriginal Peoples.The FSC standard offers a solution for Canada to properly implement its commitments to both the Nagoya convention for biodiversity protection and the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP). By submitting formal comments to the new action plan, FSC Canada hopes to cooperate with the federal government in reaching the 2020 biodiversity goals.
July 12, 2017 - Help shape the future of responsible forest management at the triennial global General Assembly of the Forest Stewardship Council, taking place in Vancouver on Oct. 8-13, 2017.
July 7, 2017 - A community forest in Williams Lake, B.C., is planning to create a fuel break to prevent a wind-driven wildfire from reaching a nearby residential area.
July 6, 2017 - PRT Growing Services (PRT) has acquired Skimikin Nursery in Tappen, B.C.
June 28, 2017 - The annual general meeting of the Forest Stewardship Council Canada, is being held in Montreal June 28-29 to finalize its new forest management standard to ensure Canada's forests meet all future needs.
June 19, 2017 - According to research published in the Southern Journal of Applied Forestry 35(4), using in-forest weighing scales can boost the payload efficiency of log trucks.
June 1, 2017 - John Deere is launching a longed-for global first at Elmia Wood. The company has now developed its crane-tip control for harvesters too. There will also be the opportunity to test operate several forest machines plus do tests on simulators at the John Deere stand. “Visitors can try out the new technology during the fair,” says Dieter Reinisch of John Deere. Crane-tip control for forest machines is a true Elmia Wood innovation, which has been developed over the past three fairs. John Deere presented the concept with the help of a forwarder simulator in 2009, which contractors could test and comment on. At Elmia Wood 2013 it was time for the world premiere of forwarders with crane-tip control, which has become a much-appreciated function. “Our customers say they move an extra load every shift thanks to crane-tip control,” Reinisch says. And now it’s time for what the industry has been talking about for ten years: crane-tip control for harvesters. This world first is being presented at Elmia Wood, installed in a John Deere 1270 harvester. Visitors to the fair can test the function both in reality and on simulators. John Deere is also presenting an updated version of its crane-tip control for harvesters. The innovations are in the software, which means that contractors who already have the function on their forwarders can obtain the innovations at their next service opportunity. All of John Deere’s machine models will be exhibited at the fair, including the three new mid-size forwarders in the G series: the 1110G, 1210G and 1510G. Also being shown is the first harvester in the G series, the 1170G with eight wheels. It is a smaller-size machine with a broad range of uses from thinning to easier final felling. One recurring request at previous fairs has been for the opportunity to test operate the machines. This wish will now be granted. John Deere is offering the chance to test operate its forwarders with a rotating and levelling cab. This function is almost standard in the Nordic markets but elsewhere contractors often choose a fixed cab for cost reasons. “At Elmia Wood they have the chance to experience the added value of a rotating and levelling cab,” Reinisch says.  Elmia Wood 7-10 June Elmia Wood is the world’s leading forestry fair and is held every four years outdoors in the forest south of Jönköping, Sweden. The last Elmia Wood (2013) had over 500 exhibitors and 50,000 visitors from around the world and was monitored by the international trade press. On 7–10 June 2017 the global forest industry will gather once more.
May 26, 2017 - Forestry tires are expensive. Take some simple, common-sense precautions to protect your investment and get the most service life and maximum safety out of your tires.Forestry-duty rubber tires are a big investment for logging operators. A set of tires for a four-wheeled skidder can cost upwards of $12,000 USD and fl otation or dual tires can be even more expensive. Skidders, forwarders and drive-to-tree feller bunchers all operate in the most extreme off road conditions of heat, cold, mud, rocks and abrasive soil. Rubber tires can wear prematurely (or fail catastrophically) if not properly looked after. Fortunately, by taking some simple, common-sense precautions, operators can protect their investment and get the most service life and maximum safety out of their tires.First and foremost, operators need to be checking their tire pressure regularly – preferably on a daily or at least weekly basis. Under infl ation can cause excessive heat buildup leading to damage to the sidewall, beads or lining. On the other hand, an over infl ated tire is more vulnerable to impact damage. Always check the tire pressure against the Tigercat and tire manufacturers’ service recommendations.When using band tracks (on bogie axle machines) tire pressure should be set to the maximum recommended pressure. This prevents the tires from squatting too much under heavy loads which can strain and damage the tire sidewalls against the side members of the band tracks. This also helps prevent the tires from spinning on the wheels and damaging their sealing beads. (Note – traction aids should only be used on Tigercat skidders with pre-approval from Tigercat Customer Service to ensure warranty coverage.)Operator training and behavior are also both critical to extending tire life. Two particular areas that operators need to be aware of are the use of differential locks and planning for the best driving path.Differential locks provide extra traction by forcing both wheels on a vehicle to spin at the same speed rather than allowing each wheel to spin at different speeds depending on traction. Pre-emptive use of differential locks in difficult terrain (muddy, steep or dusty) helps to minimize the amount of wheel spin. Many operators wait until they notice wheel spin before using the differential locks. This can lead to severe tire damage as large pieces of rubber can be sheared off if the tire makes contact with a sharp rock or stump when spinning. Differential locks should be engaged in anticipation of difficult terrain as much as possible to minimize this risk, but should be left off for driving on less challenging terrain.Finally, operators need to select the best driving path whenever possible. Operators need to be aware of the geography in the working area and carefully plan the route to be driven. How steep are the slopes? Are there areas or deep mud or hard-to-spot hollows? Going around an obstacle or mound or steep incline may take a little longer, but the savings in fuel and tire damage may well make it worthwhile. Always keep both eyes and your mind open when driving off road. Read more at www.tigercat.com. 
Feb. 10, 2017 - Nine-axle logging trucks, including tandem-drive and tridem-drive configurations, are now approved and in use on a key transportation route in the Vanderhoof area in north-central British Columbia. The approval was the culmination of a four-year collaborative effort between FPInnovations, the B.C. Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure (MoTI), the B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO), and the forest industry.
Jan. 5, 2017 - Forestry and off-road equipment operators and maintenance technicians are used to dealing with obvious dangers from spinning saws and falling tree limbs, but may be less familiar with a critical danger that can cause crippling injuries or death – high-pressure injection injuries.
Dec. 12, 2016 - Fuel quality is critical to keep Tier 4 engines running smoothly, and the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) has released a downloadable infographic to help equipment owners and users keep their machines up and running. The AEM “Get CLEAN on Fuel” infographic outlines five key actions that help protect Tier 4 engines “because while the new engines reduce diesel emissions and protect our health and the environment, the fact is they are rather finicky about fuel,” said William “Bernie” Bernhard, AEM technical and safety services manager. Bernhard explained that today’s Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) is very different from the diesel of just a few years ago. “Among other things, it is subject to change and contamination as it moves from the refinery to the engine, making storage, temperature, age and filtration, and related factors critical in maintaining fuel quality,” said Bernhard. AEM member company experts came together through the association to develop the guidelines as a way to spread more awareness of the importance of diesel fuel quality. 5 Steps to Maintain Fuel Quality The new AEM fuel-quality infographic relays 5 quick tips using the CLEAN acronym, accompanied by actionable guidelines: C - Commit to understanding your T4 engine L - Learn the facts about today’s fuel E - Evaluate your fuel source and fuel handling A - Always follow manufacturer guidelines N - Never take your role for granted Download the complete infographic at aem.org/clean.
Aug. 17, 2017 - In logging, time is money just like any other business. When your forestry machine has a technical issue that threatens your wood harvesting capacity, time is of the essence.
Aug. 9, 2017 - Watch Prime Tech's PT-300 and the PT-475, both with Tier 4 engine technology, working in steep terrain and grappling with standing trees, brush and slash as well as with stumps. The machines were in action at Prime Tech's 2017 Demo Day held in Sarnonico, Italy in late May.
Aug. 4, 2017 - Why would anyone working in Canada’s forest sector, want to travel halfway around the world to a forestry demo in a Scots pine forest in southern Sweden? Especially in June, when things are just about to get busy with the end of spring break up, and planting season just beginning? After all, what can Swedes (or their neighbours, the Finns and Norwegians) teach us about forestry? I mean, after all, the Swedish forest sector is facing a long list of challenges, including:
Aug. 1, 2017 - Komatsu America Corp. has introduced the new WA200-8 wheel loader. Equipped with an EPA Tier 4 Final certified engine, this addition to the wheel loader family combines high production with low fuel consumption and improved operator comfort.
July 31, 2017 - John Deere has updated its full line of L-Series Skidders. The L-Series models now boast best-in-class horsepower, a more impressive power-to-weight ratio, an improved engine aftertreatment system, and new grapple and boom options.
July 26, 2017 - Tigercat has launched its new telematics system called RemoteLog. RemoteLog was designed after extensive field research that included feedback from customers from around the world. The result is a simple, robust telematics solution that works even in the most remote locations.Now loggers can track key machine performance metrics from their desktop or tablet to maximize machine productivity and reduce operating costs. “RemoteLog is a valuable new tool for loggers to optimize productivity and minimize downtime by having data that matters right at your fingertips,” said telematics project engineer Rob Archibald.Logging sites are often well out of range of cellular phone service providers so RemoteLog uses a satellite data connection that provides global coverage. Data is automatically updated to secure servers on a regular basis. Data includes:1. Machine location and movements2. Activity timeline to identify when a machine is idle, operating, shutdown or refuelling3. Fuel levels and consumption4. Mechanical performance parameters5. Critical machine messagesThe data is presented in a simple, easy-to-navigate web portal that runs on all major desktop and tablet browsers so it is available from anywhere with an Internet connection. No special operator training is required. The system collects and sends data automatically. Extensive reporting and analytics built into RemoteLog mean owners can see at-a-glance when the machine is working or if there are potential problems developing.Users can also set up alerts to notify service personnel. Dealers can see error codes and other important mechanical information to help get the right service and parts on the first visit. Are hydraulic fluid temperatures higher than they should be? Is the pressure drop too high across the fuel filter? RemoteLog helps owners address simple things such as filter changes before they become major headaches and lets dealers offer proactive service for spare parts and consumables.The hardware components of RemoteLog consist of a satellite antenna on top of the machine that is well-protected by a polycarbonate housing. A telematics computer module is located in the cab. The computer module connects to the machine data bus to read maintenance information and to the satellite antenna for data upload. The computer module goes into low power mode when the machine is turned off. The module will shut down automatically after three days with no key-on cycle to conserve the machine battery.RemoteLog is now available as a factory installed option on all Tigercat machines. When specified on a new machine, RemoteLog comes with the required hardware and a free subscription to start. After the free subscription ends, plans are available for purchase through your Tigercat dealer. Contact your dealer to see if a retrofit kit is available for your existing Tigercat machine. The RemoteLog satellite antenna enclosure is made of tough polycarbonate.

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