Forestry Management
Oct. 23, 2018 – For forest companies like TimberWest, the health of the trees and associated ecosystems are paramount. From seedling to maturity, the trees must be monitored, and any problems addressed. The way in which this monitoring happens is changing dramatically through the convergence of new sensing technologies such as LiDAR and the ability to deploy sensing technology using drones.  
Oct. 15, 2018 – Charles Bloom Secondary school is being recognized by the province of British Columbia through the minister’s award for Innovation and Excellence in Woodlot Management for the south.
Sept. 28, 2018 - Starting in November, Ontario will hold roundtables and gather online feedback to help the province lay out a strategy for promoting economic growth within the forestry sector.             
Sept. 26, 2018 - FPInnovations is pleased to announce the renewal of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Forest Growers Research (FGR) of New Zealand to widen the scope of their information exchange in the area of steep slope harvesting, and to facilitate the international exchange of their combined research.

FPInnovations and FGR are mutually interested in forest technology and will share expertise in cooperative research, development, and application activities for specific projects agreed upon by both groups.

“We are very pleased to have renewed this agreement with FGR in New Zealand," said Alan Potter, vice-president, science and innovation, FPInnovations. "During the previous MOU, the conversations and information shared between the FPInnovations and New Zealand teams were extremely valuable to accelerate dissemination of research findings and the introduction of new technologies such as winch-assist systems for steep slopes in B.C.”

The MOU will also allow both parties to share in the transfer of information and technology through cooperative demonstration projects and symposia, encourage the exchange of research personnel, and prepare joint reports where possible.

”The collaboration with FPInnovations in Canada has added value to the Steepland Harvesting PGP program in terms of visits from Canadian harvesting researchers, presentations at conferences, and shared research reports over the last few years," said Russell Dale, chief executive, Forest Growers Research Ltd. "We look forward to building on this collaboration when we commence our new program on forestry automation and robotics.”

Common research areas for information exchange between FPInnovations and FGR include the environmental sustainability of harvesting operations, steep slope machine stability, steep slope road and landing construction, and soil disturbance in steep slope harvesting. Other joint topics of interest are the further development of line tension and cable integrity work, remote control and teleoperation of forest machinery, and reducing energy intensity and the carbon footprint of forest operations. The new MOU is in effect through to June, 2022.
Sept. 25, 2018 - The release of a federal government competitiveness report is an important call to action requiring a commitment from Ottawa that it is prepared to improve Canada’s global competitiveness by delivering more agile regulations, improved infrastructure, and continuing to develop a workforce for the future while accelerating innovation, say leaders from Canada’s forest products sector.
Sept. 25, 2018 - The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has confirmed the presence of emerald ash borer in Bedford, N.S.
Sept. 18, 2018 - K’ómoks First Nation, in partnership with Qualicum First Nation, welcomed TimberWest, the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB), and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (SFI) to the K’ómoks First Nation Band Office to announce that they will pilot the SFI Small-Scale Forest Management Module for Indigenous Peoples, Families, and Communities. This is to be implemented on Rosewall Forest Tenure Holdings Ltd, the jointly managed working forest of K’ómoks First Nation and Qualicum First Nation.
Sept. 14, 2018 - The federal government is funding Indigenous forestry jobs in Saskatchewan.
Sept. 14, 2018 - The BC Community Forest Association (BCCFA) has released its annual report which summarizes the benefits of community forestry in B.C.

Forty community forests participated in the survey, providing data from their last reporting year. This sample represents 93 per cent of the operating community forests in the BCCFA. Most are small rural communities, with an average population of 3,360.

“Every community forest is working to fulfill the range of expectations defined by their local community," said George Brcko, manager of the Wells Gray Community Forest and president of the BCCFA. "We created 18 indicators to measure how they are doing. This report, our fourth annual, not only shows that data, it includes dozens of stories and photos about how community forest organizations are creating incredible economic, social, cultural and environmental benefits for their Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.”

This year’s results show that community forests are creating 63 per cent more jobs/ m3 than the industry average in their forestry operations. They operate in sensitive areas, while reliably supplying logs to both major processing facilities and small manufacturers. They are showing leadership in reducing the risk of wildfire to their communities and have a significant role in the process of First Nations reconciliation beyond the legal requirements of the tenure.

A community forest agreement (CFA) is an area-based forest licence managed by a local government, community group, First Nation, or a partnership of local governments, First Nations and community groups, for the benefit of the entire community.

The BCCFA is a network of rural community-based organizations engaged in community forest management, and those seeking to establish new community forests. They represent over 90 rural and Indigenous communities across the province.

Find the Indicators Report and Executive Summary here: http://bccfa.ca/2018-indicators-report/
Aug. 24, 2018 - As the Canadian Wood recycling industry expands, one industry sector our members are providing exceptional new closed-loop diversionary wood and solid waste material recycling services in is the Canadian logging industry — log sort yard sector. 
Aug. 23, 2018 - According to a new report by Nova Scotia's University of King's College president William Lahey, the province's tree harvesting practices require fundamental changes.

The report says Nova Scotia's forestry practices should be guided by a new paradigm called "ecological forestry" which treats forestes "first and foremost" as ecosystems. 

Find the full report here.
Aug. 14, 2018 - Trees are growing more rapidly due to climate change. This sounds like good news. After all, this means that trees are storing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in their wood and hence taking away the key ingredient in global warming. But is it that simple? A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) analyzed wood samples from the oldest existing experimental areas spanning a period of 150 years — and reached a surprising conclusion.

The team led by Hans Pretzsch, professor of forest growth and yield science at the TUM, examined wood samples from several hundred trees and analyzed every single annual ring using a high-tech procedure — a total of 30,000 of them. "The heart of the lignostation is a high-frequency probe which scans each sample in steps of a hundredth of a millimeter," says Pretzsch, explaining the analysis procedure. "By doing so, we measure the specific weight of the wood with an accuracy and resolution which until recently was unthinkable." 

The wood samples come from the oldest experimental forest plots in Europe which were created at the same time the TU Munich was founded 150 years ago. The samples were taken from common European tree species such as spruces, pines, beeches, and oaks. "We have detailed knowledge of the history of every single plot and tree," says Pretzsch. "This allows us to rule out the possibility that our findings could result from the forest being managed differently now as compared to a hundred years ago." 

Climate change is making the wood lighter 
With the combination of wood samples from the 1870s to the present day coupled with the latest measurement technology, the team at the School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan were able to demonstrate that the annually growing wood has gradually become lighter since observations began — by up to eight to 12 per cent since 1900. Within the same period, the volume growth of the trees in central Europe has accelerated by 29 to 100 per cent. 

In other words, even though a greater volume of wood is being produced today, it now contains less material than just a few decades ago. However, the explanation which immediately comes to mind does not apply. "Some people might now surmise that the more rapid growth could itself be the cause for our observations," says Dr. Peter Biber, co-author of the study. "In some tree species, it is in fact the case that wider annual rings also tend to have lighter wood. But we have taken this effect into account. The decrease in wood density we are talking about is due to other factors."

Instead, Pretzsch and his team see the causes as being the long-term increase in temperature due to climate change and the resulting lengthening of the vegetation period. But the nitrogen input from agriculture, traffic, and industry also play a part. A number of details lead experts to surmise this, such as the decrease in the density of late wood and the increase in the percentage of early wood in the annual rings. 

Lighter wood — What's the problem?
Lighter wood is less solid and it has a lower calorific value. This is crucial for numerous application scenarios ranging from wood construction to energy production. Less solid wood in living trees also increases the risk of damage events such as breakage due to wind and snow in forests. 

But the most important finding for practical and political aspects is that the current climate-relevant carbon sequestration of the forests is being overestimated as long as it is calculated with established but outdated wood densities. "The accelerated growth is still resulting in surplus carbon sequestration," says Pretzsch. "But scaling up for the forests of central Europe, the traditional estimate would be to high by about 10 million metric tons of carbon per year."

More Information:
The research group at the Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science at the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan led by Hans Pretzsch investigates the effect of climate change on the growth, stability, and vitality of trees. An important basis for this research are the experimental plots of the Chair, on which the dynamics of forests have been measured since 1879 to answer ecological and economic questions. In the study reported here, they contribute to measuring the human footprint in forest ecosystems.

Publications:
Pretzsch, H., Biber, P., Schütze, G., Kemmerer, J. and Uhl, E.: Wood density reduced while wood volume growth accelerated in Central European forests since 1870, Forest Ecology and Management, Volume 429/2018. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2018.07.045

Pretzsch, H., Biber, P., Uhl, E., Dahlhausen, J., Schütze, G., Perkins, D., Rötzer, T., Caldentey, J., Koike, T., van Con, T., Chavanne, A., du Toit, B., Foster, K., Lefer, B.: Climate change accelerates growth of urban trees in metropolises worldwide. Scientific Reports 7/ 2017. DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-14831-w.

Pretzsch, H., Biber, P., Schütze, G., Uhl, E., Rötzer, T.: Forest stand growth dynamics in Central Europe have accelerated since 1870. Nature Communications 5/ 2014.

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Hans Pretzsch
Technical University of Munich
Chair for Forest Growth
Phone: +49 (8161) 71 - 4710
Mail:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it



The Technical University of Munich (TUM) is one of Europe's leading research universities, with around 550 professors, 41,000 students, and 10,000 academic and non-academic staff. Its focus areas are the engineering sciences, natural sciences, life sciences and medicine, combined with economic and social sciences. TUM acts as an entrepreneurial university that promotes talents and creates value for society. In that it profits from having strong partners in science and industry. It is represented worldwide with the TUM Asia campus in Singapore as well as offices in Beijing, Brussels, Cairo, Mumbai, San Francisco, and São Paulo. Nobel Prize winners and inventors such as Rudolf Diesel, Carl von Linde, and Rudolf Mößbauer have done research at TUM. In 2006 and 2012 it won recognition as a German "Excellence University." In international rankings, TUM regularly places among the best universities in Germany.
Aug. 9, 2018 - Ontario's Ford government has committed an additional $100 million to fight forest fires across the province.

Since April 1, Ontario has experienced an escalated fire situation, with approximately 120 wildfires currently burning in parts of central and northern Ontario.

"This money will pay for continued fire response efforts, which includes supplies and equipment used to suppress the fire and the work of support personnel and MNRF fire rangers," Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry Jeff Yurek said. "It will also fund further assistance from our out-of-province and international partners so we can continue to fight the fires aggressively on the ground and in the air."

Almost 1,000 firefighters from Ontario are currently being assisted by about 480 firefighters and support staff, as well as aircraft and other equipment, from other provinces, Parks Canada, American states, and Mexico.

"Our number one priority is the safety of the public and the protection of communities and private property," Yurek said.

Ontario is an internationally recognized leader in wildland fire management. Annually, the government provides base funding of almost $70 million to deliver front-line operations for forest fires.

Ontario will continue to dedicate as many resources as necessary to fight the wildfires across the province and help ensure the safety and protection of communities and private property, during one of the worst fire seasons in over a decade.

For more information on the wildfires, please visit ontario.ca/forestfire.
Aug. 9, 2018 - Maritime Innovation Limited — J.D. Irving Limited’s (JDI) research lab in Sussex, N.B. — is one of only three places in the world that applies genetic science to grow softwood trees to sustain healthy forests and related forest products jobs. That means growing taller, straighter and more disease-resistant trees faster than they’re being harvested. The original seed sources are from local parent trees selected from forests across the region.
Aug. 8, 2018 - Field Surveys are an important part of sustainable forest management. Most of the forest departments across Canada have been using traditional paper-based surveys. However, Manitoba Forestry and Peatlands Branch digitalized their survey workflow using mobile geospatial technology. Tony Viveiros and Marianne Porteous at Manitoba Sustainable Development elaborate more on their use of geographic information system (GIS) technology to increase efficiency and collaboration across the department.
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