Forestry Management
Dec. 6, 2017 - It’s an exciting time for British Columbia’s steep-slope-harvesting forestry workers and employers. Approximately 25 new mechanized-harvesting machines equipped with winch-assist technology are operating in the province, and another 20 are anticipated to be put into use over the next two years on British Columbia’s rugged, often treacherous forested landscape.
Nov. 30, 2017 - Overshadowed by B.C.'s unprecedented wildfire season, the U.S. states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana also experienced a significant and disruptive wildfire year. 

By early September, almost two million acres of forest and rangeland had burned in the U.S. Northwest. Harvest operations across the four states have been hampered by restrictions on operating hours, disruptions in transportation, and loggers diverted to fighting wildfires. In Montana, several sawmills had to close operations intermittently in the 3Q/17 due to the proximity of wildfires. Full harvest operations resumed after late September rains, though whether there was sufficient time to replenish sawlog and pulplog inventories before winter conditions set in remains the key question for many log procurement managers this fall. 

Unlike B.C. and its large provincially-owned commercial timber base, the loss of burnt timber on U.S. federal forests has had little impact on the availability of timber with the exception being Montana, where regular timber sales from federal lands have proven crucial to selected sawmills. In general, however, the U.S. Forest Service timber sale program provides minimal sawlog or pulplog volumes to the forest industry in Western U.S.

With lower harvest levels in the Northwest due to wildfire-risk constraints, local sawmills expanded their procurement into small-diameter chip-n-saw grades and higher quality pulplogs that typically would be used by the region's pulpmills. This less valuable log source, resulting in lower lumber yields, has still been profitable for many sawmills thanks to the high prices for softwood lumber during 2017.  

The increased competition for small-diameter logs has resulted in a dwindling supply of traditional pulplogs normally available for pulpmills and independent chipping operators, with pulplog inventories in August reaching their lowest level since the 2Q/14. The low level of pulplogs in the region's pulp industry this late in the season is a major concern among wood fiber managers in the U.S. Northwest as they seek to build adequate inventory levels of logs for the winter season when residual chip supply from the lumber industry typically declines. 



The North American Wood Fiber Review (NAWFR) has tracked wood fiber markets in the US and Canada for over 30 years and it is the only publicationthat includes prices for sawlogs, pulpwood, wood chips and biomass in North America. The 36-page quarterly report includes wood market updates for 15 regions on the continent in addition to the latest export statistics for sawlogs, lumber, wood pellets and wood chips.
Nov. 16, 2017 - With public consultations and testing completed, FSC Canada anticipates the final version of the standard to be ready for 2018.

Following the field testing of the National Forest Management Standard in spring 2017, the Standards Development Group has been working diligently to reach consensus on a final version of the standard. 

The new standard has several key elements that differentiate it from its predecessor such as Indicators that deal with free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) and managing species at risk. FSC Canada will be releasing a public summary of significant changes from Draft 2 to the pre-approved draft once the standard is finalized. 

Upon approval by the Standards Development Group, the Standard will be sent to the FSC Canada Board of Directors in December 2017 and then will be submitted to FSC International for final approval in January 2018. We anticipate approval from FSC international by spring 2018. 

Intact Forest Landscapes and Indigenous Cultural Landscapes
Indicators for intact forest landscapes and Indigenous cultural landscapes will continue to be developed until 2019. These requirements will be developed to be aligned with species at risk indicators; other landscape requirements; and Intact Forest Landscape approaches. 

Scale, intensity and risk
Scale, intensity and risk indicators specific to smallholders and community forests will not be included in the final draft of the standard. With FSC International’s ‘New Approaches’ program aiming to enable smallholders to design a certification system that works for them, FSC Canada will work with FSC International to develop a smallholder and community standard and will adapt requirements in the next revision of FSC’s forest management standard. Until the new scale, intensity and risk related standard is ready, smallholder and community forests in Canada will be able to continue using existing regional forest management standards (BC, Maritimes and draft Great Lakes St-Lawrence Standard).

What happens once the standard is approved?
As of the effective date, Certificate holders will have 1 year to transition to the new standard. Within the transition period, certificate holders can choose to be audited to the current forest management standards or the revised National Forest Management Standard. But all certificate holders will be evaluated against the revised National Forest Management Standard within 1 year.

FSC Canada will support certificate holders and certification bodies with the transition and implementation of the revised standard with training beginning in 2018. 



Background
FSC Canada initiated the standard revision process in 2012 to align to the new international generic indicators and merge all four regional standards into a single National Forest Management Standard that properly reflects the realities of forestry in Canada in 2017. Draft 1 of the standard was released for public consultation in 2015 and a second draft was released in 2016 for a 60-day public consultation. The draft standard was then field/desk tested in spring 2017. FSC Canada plans to have the final version of the standard approved in 2018.
Nov. 16, 2017 - Tree seeds are of course critical to future forests. Management of high quality seed of known origin is crucial if our future forests are to withstand the impacts of climate change. Despite this, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) has decided to close the Ontario Tree Seed Plant (OTSP) in less than a year.

Located in Angus (west of Barrie) since 1923, it is a unique facility that is home to expert processing and storage of billions of tree seed. The OTSP is the seed bank for future forests in southern and northern Ontario, managed by 6 expert staff with an annual budget less than $2 million. The shutdown decision came as a surprise - no analysis of other delivery or cost cutting options, and no consultation with clients, stakeholders and the community.

Historically, MNR Seed Program staff managed seed for government programs that annually planted over 100 million trees on Crown Land in Northern Ontario, and up to 20 million on private land in Southern Ontario. Those trees became the forests that surround us today.

In the mid-90’s, cutbacks saw the MNR reforestation program dismantled. Tree nurseries, established by pioneering foresters Drury and Zavitz in the 1920’s, were closed and sold, and plans made to privatize the Seed Plant. The Forest Gene Conservation Association (FGCA), working with stakeholders, helped MNR management understand that tree seed expertise was an irreplaceable ecological and social benefit. Even private nurseries advocated for keeping the Seed Plant in public hands.

In 1999, MNR leadership reconsidered, and recognized the value of the OTSP’s critically important role in providing genetically adapted native seeds for planting programs. Tree nurseries were able to increase the propagation of locally adapted trees for our cities and countryside. OTSP seed was the foundation for the 50 Million Tree Program in 2007, without it the program could not have been built.

The OTSP closure is a game changer - with the potential to be a game ender. The FGCA and Forest Ontario’s grower and planting partners are very concerned. Where will the millions of stored seeds go? Where will next year’s seed crops be processed? Who will monitor seed quality and track seed source? Who will invest in the expertise needed to establish and maintain a long-term seed bank - a critical weapon to fight the impacts of climate change?

Dianne Saxe, the Environmental Commissioner recently reported that Ontario’s forests are under increasing stress from climate change. Climate models show that southern Ontario’s trees, adapted to a warmer climate, will be the best source of seed for Northern Ontario before the 22nd century. But many southern forests have been lost to agriculture and development. The remainder face introduced exotic plants, insects and diseases that challenge native trees from regenerating. Given these serious threats, seed management and banking capacity needs to be increased, not stopped.

Premier Wynne has shown leadership on climate change - a tremendously complex challenge. And the FGCA knows the best way to manage complex challenges like forest restoration is to make it easier for people to do the right thing. But this short-sighted decision by the Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry, to abandon seed management and banking, will make it very difficult to ensure the resilience of Ontario’s forest under climate change.

There is no future without forests, and no forests without seed. The plan to close the OTSP must be reconsidered.



Barb Boysen is general manager of the Forest Gene Conservation Association based in Kemptville, Ont., and Melissa Spearing is the FGCA’s seed program coordinator.
Nov. 14, 2017 - A new report by Forest Economic Advisors (FEA), commissioned by the Softwood Lumber Board (SLB), highlights the importance of softwood lumber manufacturing to the U.S. economy and, in particular, the health of rural communities. Through both direct manufacture and via downstream industries that use softwood lumber as a primary input, FEA estimates that 775,674 jobs, with a total payroll of more than $46 billion, are tied to the softwood lumber manufacturing industry.

There are currently 509 sawmills operating in 464 mostly rural communities across 32 states.  Softwood lumber’s economic impact extends far beyond the direct sales, employment, and wages of the nation’s lumber mills. In many ways, mills formed microeconomic hubs that generated substantial indirect and induced employment and wages, in the form of the goods and services mills purchased for their operations, and the goods, materials, and services workers bought using their incomes, including through investment in housing. Because most mills are in rural areas with limited alternative employment opportunities, these jobs are of particular importance to state and regional economies.  When tabulating these, softwood lumber’s total direct impact in 2016 was 208,107 jobs and $11.35 billion in wages. Many would be surprised to learn that the softwood lumber industry employs more people than oil and gas extraction (181,430 jobs) or primary steel manufacturing (140,200 jobs).

FEA also assessed the economic impacts of seven downstream industries that rely heavily on lumber as a primary input in their operations, including the manufacture of trusses, windows, doors, millwork, wood containers, and pallets; wood preservation; wood remanufacturing; and the lumber wholesale trade. Together these industries accounted for 567,567 indirect &induced jobs, with annual wages of $34.93 billion.

The Softwood Lumber Board’s role is to strengthen and diversify the demand for softwood lumber.  Over the last five years the SLB has contributed to increasing demand by 2.59 billion board feet.  The SLB’s impact has grown each year, creating 906 million board feet of increased demand in 2016 alone.  The SLB supports the market by supporting strong and safe building codes for wood, inspiring and educating architects and engineers on the benefits of wood construction, promoting the benefits of softwood lumber products in and around the home, and pursuing new markets for softwood lumber such as mass timber, mid-rise and tall wood construction.

FEA’s findings confirm the importance of the SLB’s efforts to safeguard and increase softwood lumber’s market share, as literally tens of thousands of families in hundreds of different communities rely on a healthy, strong softwood lumber industry.
Oct. 30, 2017 - This month, the Ontario Forest Industries Association (OFIA) held their first annual Forestry Advocacy Day at Queen’s Park. OFIA staff and Board Directors met with several Ministers and Members of Provincial Parliament from the Liberal, Progressive Conservative (PC) and New Democratic Party (NDP) Caucuses. During these meetings, OFIA and its members, presented Provincial officials with their 2018 pre-budget submission. The OFIA submission outlines how Ontario can develop a Provincial forest strategy that accepts and embraces the sustainable use of Ontario’s forests. (To read OFIA’s 2018 Pre-Budget Submission, please visit: www.ofia.com). 

For generations, OFIA’s member companies have been putting Ontario’s wood to work responsibly, growing local economies by harvesting and growing trees. “On OFIA’s Forestry Advocacy Day, and every day, we want to acknowledge the vital role that forestry plays in our communities across every region of Ontario and for those 57,000 men and women directly employed by the sector,” OFIA president and chief executive officer Jamie Lim said. “We have presented the challenges in forestry in Ontario, provided a path full of opportunities to grow the sector, and now we look forward to working with all three parties to make Ontario’s forest sector stronger.”

During OFIA’s Forestry Advocacy Day, OFIA and its members spoke to the three provincial parties and encouraged the establishment of a provincial forest strategy for Ontario. All three parties acknowledged that Ontario harvests so little of its Crown forests – less than 0.5 per cent – and yet the benefits are so great in a sector that generates $15.5 billion of economic activity and provides well-paying jobs for 172,000 people in every region of the province.

Erik Holmstrom, chair of OFIA and Ontario timberlands manager for Weyerhaeuser noted, “Our businesses run and prosper on certainty, yet for Ontario’s forestry community, consistent access to affordable wood in Ontario continues to be uncertain. The sustainable use of our renewable Crown forests results in well-paying jobs and a wide range of social and economic benefits. As members of OFIA, we are grateful for the opportunity to be at Queen’s Park speaking to the people involved in making decisions that affect our livelihoods.”

OFIA believes that by working with government and affected stakeholders to address key competitive challenges, we can make Ontario’s forest sector stronger, maximizing the full potential of Ontario’s renewable resource, create good paying jobs and assist the province in transitioning to a low carbon economy that will support sustainable growth for future generations. 



Ontario’s renewable forest products sector supports over 172,000 direct and indirect jobs in 260 Ontario communities. Since 1943, the Ontario Forest Industries Association has represented forestry companies ranging from multinational corporations to family operated businesses producing advanced manufactured products and technologies. OFIA believes that by working with government to address key competitive issues, secure long-term access to affordable and accessible fibre and promote the province’s 21st century forest products sector, Ontario will be the number one jurisdiction in Canada for today’s green and growing renewable sector. To learn more about OFIA and its innovative forestry members, follow us on Twitter @OFIA_info, or visit www.ofia.com 
Oct. 30, 2017 – Natural Resources Canada has released its 2017 State of Canada’s Forests report. This latest edition delves into forest fires by examining the Fort McMurray fire, and explaining why Canada’s forests need fires.

There is also a focus on the bioeconomy of Canada’s forest sector, and a look at Canada’s timber forest products.

“With the third-largest forested area on the planet, Canada boasts nearly 40 per cent of the world's certified forests, far more than any other country,” Minister of Natural Resources, Jim Carr said in a statement. “From Yukon to Newfoundland and Labrador, the forest sector is benefiting local communities, boosting our economy, helping to advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples and showing us what we can accomplish when we work together.”

The largest portion of the 2017 report assesses sustainability indicators such as whether timber is being harvested sustainably, how disturbances like forest diseases and insects shape Canada’s forests, how Canadians benefit from forests through employment, and how the forest industry in turn benefits Canada’s economy.

In 2016, approximately 211,000 people were employed by the forest industry. The same year, the forest industry contributed $23 billion to Canada’s gross domestic product (GDP), according to the report.

“Our government believes in this industry and is excited about its future. As this year's chair of the CCFM [Canadian Council of Forest Ministers], Natural Resources Canada has worked with the provinces and territories to highlight forestry's central role in some of the most important issues of our time: combatting climate change, driving innovation and creating economic opportunities for rural and Indigenous communities,” Carr said.

“This edition of The State of Canada's Forests examines some of these exciting opportunities, from the emerging bioeconomy and new construction materials to innovative uses for forest products in auto parts, bioplastics, biochemicals and textiles.”
Oct. 26, 2017 - The Home Depot is increasing its protection of High Conservation Value Forests and tropical Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) by not accepting any wood products from The Amazon (South America) andCongo (Africa) Basins, unless Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified.

Although less than one per cent of the company's existing wood products come from the Amazon and Congo Basins, The Home Depot announced on Wednesday that it will require that any wood products coming from these areas be FSC certified. The company has given preference to FSC certified wood products since 1999. 

The company announced the updated policy in its 2017 Responsibility Report. The full report is located online.

The report also unveils newly strengthened chemical oversight practices in five product categories, including paint, carpet, vinyl and laminate flooring, and insulation. 

The chemical strategy includes commitments to increase the assortment of products that have transparency of product ingredients and third party certification of chemical ingredients. Additionally, the company is committed to working with suppliers to improve chemicals in categories with the greatest potential impact to indoor air quality, and will conduct annual reviews of product categories to track progress and drive innovation.  

The company partners with the Green Chemistry and Commerce Council, Healthy Building Network and Cradle to Cradle for guidance on priority chemicals and innovations.

"We recognize the role we play in the value chain for home improvement products, especially lumber and manufactured goods," said Ron Jarvis, vice-president of environmental innovation. "We believe that better transparency is the key to retailers and consumers making better purchasing decisions that will improve our industry's long-term environmental impact."
Oct. 23, 2017 - The last decade in British Columbia has seen an incredible increase in the number of First Nations actively participating and engaging in the forest industry, not only as licensees but often as business owners and contractors.
Oct. 20, 2017 - Caribou protection plans must factor in more comprehensive science or run the risk of being ineffectual and putting thousands of forest sector workers out of the job, warns the Forest Products Association of Canada.
Oct. 20, 2017 - The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Canada strongly endorses the call for a chapter to be added to the proposed renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that recognizes and calls for the rights of the Indigenous Peoples of North America to be respected, according to the terms of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

FSC is reacting to the announcement on Oct. 18, 2017, that the National Congress of American Indians had passed a resolution at its annual meeting, backed by the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) of Canada, to support the inclusion of a chapter in a renegotiated NAFTA that references UNDRIP and ensures a final new NAFTA deal doesn't negatively impact Indigenous rights.

UNDRIP was adopted by the United Nations in 2007 and all three countries in NAFTA – Canada, United States and Mexico – have ratified and support its terms. FSC Canada has taken a leading role in the whole natural resources sector by recognizing the key role Indigenous Peoples have to play in forestry activities on their territories. FSC is the only forest certification body to support the provisions of UNDRIP with regards to Free, Prior, Informed Consent.

Along with the Economic, Environmental and Social Chambers, FSC Canada also has an Aboriginal Peoples Chamber that deliberate on the elements of the standards required for forests to achieve FSC certification as being responsibly managed for sustainability.

"Having a chapter in NAFTA recognizing the pivotal role Indigenous Peoples should play in the economic development of North America would be an important step forward for all three countries to live up to their obligations under UNDRIP and assist in the protection of Canada's forests through responsible development," said François Dufresne, president of FSC Canada. "We fully support this effort of the AFN and its American counterpart."

Roughly 20 per cent – 55 million hectares – of the managed forest area in Canada is FSC certified. But irresponsible forestry can be a major threat to Indigenous Peoples and the environment. If all of that activity was required to meet FSC standards, that risk would be greatly mitigated, including protecting the rights of Aboriginal peoples as well as forest species at risk such as woodland caribou.

The FSC standard offers a solution for Canada to properly implement its commitments to both UNDRIP and the Nagoya convention for biodiversity protection.
Oct. 12, 2017 - The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) launched an ambitious new initiative on Wednesday to increase the use of materials from responsibly managed forests. The Vancouver Declaration allows businesses which use these natural products to pledge their commitment to increase responsible sourcing.

Global companies like IKEA, H&M, SIG, Marks and Spencer, Jysk, Mitsubishi Paper Mills or Fuji Xerox have pledged support to the initiative. The aim is to get more businesses across the entire supply chain on board.

"It's fantastic to see so many great businesses supporting this declaration," said the FSC's director general Kim Carstensen. "Our forests are a wonderful yet delicate natural resource, and a lot of people's lives depend of their sustainable and responsible use. By committing to using FSC-certified wood and forest products, our partners are helping to protect our forests – and the planet – for future generations."

IKEA's global forestry manager Mikhail Tarasov said, "IKEA is committed to only use wood from more sustainable sources (currently FSC certified and recycled) by 2020 and promote sustainable forest management beyond our own needs to make it an industry norm. This is what we call 'forest positive.' So it was natural for us to support the Vancouver Declaration. We're proud to be part of this global initiative."

The Vancouver Declaration is part of FSC's wider ambition to help businesses meet the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. President and general manager of SIG, Samuel Sigrist, presented the initiative at FSC's 2017 General Assembly. "We believe that this initiative, with its commitment to FSC certification, is a key tool in achieving parts of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals," he said. "We are the first in our industry to be able to display the FSC label on 100 per cent of our packs. This is a major milestone for SIG on its journey to become a 'net positive' business, helping to create more natural resources than we use."
Oct. 6, 2017 - Encouraging the long-term use of wood in Canada's construction industry will help us achieve our climate change goals while increasing the demand for Canadian wood products and creating good, middle-class jobs for Canadians.

Canada's Minister of Natural Resources, Jim Carr, announced on Friday the launch of a new mass timber program, Green Construction Through Wood (GCWood). It is aimed at encouraging the long-term use of wood in non-traditional construction projects, such as tall buildings, as part of the government's efforts to position Canada as a leader in the global low-carbon economy. 

The program launch follows the government's budget 2017 announcement of $39.8 million over four years, starting in April 2018, to undertake this initiative.

"By investing in this innovative program, we can help reduce GHG emissions while creating jobs for Canadians and opportunities for Canadian businesses,” said Minister Carr. “We are also helping position Canada as a world leader in a low-carbon global economy."

Wood-based materials, over their life cycle, use less energy and emit fewer greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants than traditional, energy-intensive materials. Using them will reduce the overall carbon footprint of most buildings, helping Canada reach its 2030 climate change target and support its long-term commitments under the Paris Agreement.

With this new funding, GCWood will build on the past successes of the Tall Wood Building Demonstration Initiative (TWBDI), which resulted in the construction of the world's tallest hybrid wood building at 18 storeys, the Brock Commons Tallwood House at the University of British Columbia. It will also facilitate revisions to the 2020 and 2025 National Building Code of Canada to allow tall wood buildings beyond the current limit of six storeys, up to 12 storeys and even taller, and help develop design and costing tools to assist designers and builders.   

The formal call for Expressions of Interest for the program, which focuses on tall wood building projects (10 storeys and above), is now open and accepting applications, which are due by Dec. 6, 2017.
Sept. 29, 2017 - The Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (SFI) announced Thursday that J.D. Irving (JDI) is the 2017 winner of the SFI Leadership in Conservation Award. This award, announced at the SFI Annual Conference, recognizes SFI Program Participants across Canada and the U.S. who are involved in strong partnerships focused on conservation.

In 2016, SFI Program Participants reported on 420 different audited research projects with more than 500 unique partner organizations. JDI collaborated in 68 forest research projects, the highest number of any SFI Program Participant.

Project highlights include JDI's award-winning Unique Areas Program, which has grown from 29 sites in the 1980s to more than 1,300 today. The program focuses on protecting unique elements in working forests. The sites are found and mapped by over 100 forestry professionals working in Maine, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The program has four broad objectives: preserving rare and uncommon species and landscape features; monitoring important indicator species; establishing a database of species and natural features; and engaging the public and stakeholders.

JDI has provided instrumental leadership as a founder of the Collaboration for Atlantic Salmon Tomorrow (CAST). CAST is a partnership of scientists, environmental groups and industry participants focused on saving wild Atlantic salmon. Today 11 scientists are at work on four projects using the best technology to count, save and grow wild Atlantic salmon populations.

JDI is supporting a large study of white-tailed deer through collaboration with six scientists as well as partners in government across New Brunswick and Maine. The deer research is using GPS tracking and extremely accurate forest inventory mapping to look at how deer are using different forest types during summer and winter months. This long-term study will monitor 140 deer and the habitats they choose over the next four years.

J.D. Irving, Limited has also partnered with Natural Resources Canada, Carleton University, and Environment and Climate Change Canada on a five-year songbird habitat research project on JDI land in Northern New Brunswick.

Researchers are collecting songbird data with auto-acoustic recording devices. During the breeding season in May and June of 2016, 323 sites were monitored across 17 different forest types. The recordings are being analyzed to determine the variety of songbirds present at specific GPS locations. Researchers also have access to JDI's enhanced, high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) mapping of the entire forest study area to build habitat models individual species that can be projected across the entire forest. Over 500 hours of expert listening to the recordings is being conducted with first‑year results to be completed in early 2017. Monitoring and analysis of breeding data will continue for several years and form the basis for ongoing monitoring, especially in light of climate change.

"We appreciate this recognition by SFI," said Jim Irving, co-CEO of J.D. Irving, Limited. "This award is a real tribute to our woodlands team, and the many partners with whom we are proud to work with on research and conservation initiatives. These voluntary investments in science and conservation are a cornerstone of our sustainability commitment and have been part of the way we do business for over 30 years."

The SFI community is committed to supporting forest research. SFI requires participants to support research to improve forest health, conservation understanding, productivity and sustainable management of forest resources.

"J.D. Irving stands out as a research leader that engages universities and conservation partners year after year. As Canada marks its 150th anniversary we are pleased to recognize J.D. Irving, Limited, whose roots in forestry go back 135 years," said Kathy Abusow, president and CEO of SFI Inc.

JDI invests $1.5 million annually in forest research. This investment continues to guide best practices on the ground. On average, 12 graduate students and assistants are engaged in research every year on lands owned or managed by JDI. Much of this research is conducted in collaboration with universities, and it seeks to build knowledge that JDI and other forest managers can integrate into adaptive forest management plans that account for species at risk, water quality, wildlife and climate change.

JDI also supports projects funded in part by SFI Conservation Grants. A research partnership with Bird Studies Canada received SFI grant funding to facilitate the monitoring of endangered and threatened bird species, including the piping plover and Bicknell's thrush, on JDI and adjacent government lands. Another project received SFI grant funding to help FPInnovations work with JDI on continuous improvement of harvesting techniques. FPInnovations is a non-profit forest research institute with partners across Canada.
Sept. 27, 2017 – Tree planting charity, Tree Canada is celebrating its 25th anniversary on National Tree Day Wednesday by planting its 82 millionth tree in Canada.

Over the past 20 years, Tree Canada has engaged communities, governments, corporations and individuals in the pursuit of a greener and healthier living environment, and provides Canadians with education, technical expertise, and resources to plant and care for urban and rural trees. In the midst of its most impactful year to date, in 2017, Tree Canada announced a more than $1 million investment to restore the forests destroyed by the devastating Fort McMurray wildfires last year.

"Growing in size every year, National Tree Day helps remind Canadians of the importance of trees — how they beautify our communities, naturally cool our cities in the summer, and combat climate change, and help improve human health," said Michael Rosen, president of Tree Canada. "As Tree Canada celebrates our 25th year of growing greener, healthier places for Canadians to live, we look forward to 25 more years of playing a leading role in the preservation of Canada's  urban forest across the country."   

As the largest urban forest organization in the country, Tree Canada also celebrated the 150th anniversary of Confederation with 150 tree-planting initiatives in communities in every province and territory across the country.

Tree Canada has been a driving force behind the establishment of a National Tree Day in Canada. It falls on the third week of September, which is recognized as National Forest Week across the country. Until October 1st, Canadians can take The National Tree Day Challenge at nationaltreeday.ca for their chance to win a trip to Banff, Alta.

"Throughout Canada's  history, our trees and forests have helped to define us as a nation and shape us as a people. On this day – National Tree Day – I would like to commend Tree Canada for the remarkable work they have done for 25 years to promote our nation's forests,” said Minister of Natural Resources Canada Jim Carr.

On National Tree Day, Tree Canada will mark its 25th anniversary with a ceremonial tree planting near the Bytown Museum at 1 Canal Lane, just below Parliament Hill. The event gets under way at 12:15 p.m. and will feature special guests including The Honourable Jim Carr, Minister of Natural Resources, The Honourable Joyce Murray, MP Vancouver Quadra and Ottawa City Councillor Catherine McKenney.
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