Forestry Management
Oct. 12, 2017 - The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) launched an ambitious new initiative on Wednesday to increase the use of materials from responsibly managed forests. The Vancouver Declaration allows businesses which use these natural products to pledge their commitment to increase responsible sourcing.

Global companies like IKEA, H&M, SIG, Marks and Spencer, Jysk, Mitsubishi Paper Mills or Fuji Xerox have pledged support to the initiative. The aim is to get more businesses across the entire supply chain on board.

"It's fantastic to see so many great businesses supporting this declaration," said the FSC's director general Kim Carstensen. "Our forests are a wonderful yet delicate natural resource, and a lot of people's lives depend of their sustainable and responsible use. By committing to using FSC-certified wood and forest products, our partners are helping to protect our forests – and the planet – for future generations."

IKEA's global forestry manager Mikhail Tarasov said, "IKEA is committed to only use wood from more sustainable sources (currently FSC certified and recycled) by 2020 and promote sustainable forest management beyond our own needs to make it an industry norm. This is what we call 'forest positive.' So it was natural for us to support the Vancouver Declaration. We're proud to be part of this global initiative."

The Vancouver Declaration is part of FSC's wider ambition to help businesses meet the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. President and general manager of SIG, Samuel Sigrist, presented the initiative at FSC's 2017 General Assembly. "We believe that this initiative, with its commitment to FSC certification, is a key tool in achieving parts of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals," he said. "We are the first in our industry to be able to display the FSC label on 100 per cent of our packs. This is a major milestone for SIG on its journey to become a 'net positive' business, helping to create more natural resources than we use."
Oct. 6, 2017 - Encouraging the long-term use of wood in Canada's construction industry will help us achieve our climate change goals while increasing the demand for Canadian wood products and creating good, middle-class jobs for Canadians.

Canada's Minister of Natural Resources, Jim Carr, announced on Friday the launch of a new mass timber program, Green Construction Through Wood (GCWood). It is aimed at encouraging the long-term use of wood in non-traditional construction projects, such as tall buildings, as part of the government's efforts to position Canada as a leader in the global low-carbon economy. 

The program launch follows the government's budget 2017 announcement of $39.8 million over four years, starting in April 2018, to undertake this initiative.

"By investing in this innovative program, we can help reduce GHG emissions while creating jobs for Canadians and opportunities for Canadian businesses,” said Minister Carr. “We are also helping position Canada as a world leader in a low-carbon global economy."

Wood-based materials, over their life cycle, use less energy and emit fewer greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants than traditional, energy-intensive materials. Using them will reduce the overall carbon footprint of most buildings, helping Canada reach its 2030 climate change target and support its long-term commitments under the Paris Agreement.

With this new funding, GCWood will build on the past successes of the Tall Wood Building Demonstration Initiative (TWBDI), which resulted in the construction of the world's tallest hybrid wood building at 18 storeys, the Brock Commons Tallwood House at the University of British Columbia. It will also facilitate revisions to the 2020 and 2025 National Building Code of Canada to allow tall wood buildings beyond the current limit of six storeys, up to 12 storeys and even taller, and help develop design and costing tools to assist designers and builders.   

The formal call for Expressions of Interest for the program, which focuses on tall wood building projects (10 storeys and above), is now open and accepting applications, which are due by Dec. 6, 2017.
Sept. 29, 2017 - The Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (SFI) announced Thursday that J.D. Irving (JDI) is the 2017 winner of the SFI Leadership in Conservation Award. This award, announced at the SFI Annual Conference, recognizes SFI Program Participants across Canada and the U.S. who are involved in strong partnerships focused on conservation.

In 2016, SFI Program Participants reported on 420 different audited research projects with more than 500 unique partner organizations. JDI collaborated in 68 forest research projects, the highest number of any SFI Program Participant.

Project highlights include JDI's award-winning Unique Areas Program, which has grown from 29 sites in the 1980s to more than 1,300 today. The program focuses on protecting unique elements in working forests. The sites are found and mapped by over 100 forestry professionals working in Maine, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The program has four broad objectives: preserving rare and uncommon species and landscape features; monitoring important indicator species; establishing a database of species and natural features; and engaging the public and stakeholders.

JDI has provided instrumental leadership as a founder of the Collaboration for Atlantic Salmon Tomorrow (CAST). CAST is a partnership of scientists, environmental groups and industry participants focused on saving wild Atlantic salmon. Today 11 scientists are at work on four projects using the best technology to count, save and grow wild Atlantic salmon populations.

JDI is supporting a large study of white-tailed deer through collaboration with six scientists as well as partners in government across New Brunswick and Maine. The deer research is using GPS tracking and extremely accurate forest inventory mapping to look at how deer are using different forest types during summer and winter months. This long-term study will monitor 140 deer and the habitats they choose over the next four years.

J.D. Irving, Limited has also partnered with Natural Resources Canada, Carleton University, and Environment and Climate Change Canada on a five-year songbird habitat research project on JDI land in Northern New Brunswick.

Researchers are collecting songbird data with auto-acoustic recording devices. During the breeding season in May and June of 2016, 323 sites were monitored across 17 different forest types. The recordings are being analyzed to determine the variety of songbirds present at specific GPS locations. Researchers also have access to JDI's enhanced, high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) mapping of the entire forest study area to build habitat models individual species that can be projected across the entire forest. Over 500 hours of expert listening to the recordings is being conducted with first‑year results to be completed in early 2017. Monitoring and analysis of breeding data will continue for several years and form the basis for ongoing monitoring, especially in light of climate change.

"We appreciate this recognition by SFI," said Jim Irving, co-CEO of J.D. Irving, Limited. "This award is a real tribute to our woodlands team, and the many partners with whom we are proud to work with on research and conservation initiatives. These voluntary investments in science and conservation are a cornerstone of our sustainability commitment and have been part of the way we do business for over 30 years."

The SFI community is committed to supporting forest research. SFI requires participants to support research to improve forest health, conservation understanding, productivity and sustainable management of forest resources.

"J.D. Irving stands out as a research leader that engages universities and conservation partners year after year. As Canada marks its 150th anniversary we are pleased to recognize J.D. Irving, Limited, whose roots in forestry go back 135 years," said Kathy Abusow, president and CEO of SFI Inc.

JDI invests $1.5 million annually in forest research. This investment continues to guide best practices on the ground. On average, 12 graduate students and assistants are engaged in research every year on lands owned or managed by JDI. Much of this research is conducted in collaboration with universities, and it seeks to build knowledge that JDI and other forest managers can integrate into adaptive forest management plans that account for species at risk, water quality, wildlife and climate change.

JDI also supports projects funded in part by SFI Conservation Grants. A research partnership with Bird Studies Canada received SFI grant funding to facilitate the monitoring of endangered and threatened bird species, including the piping plover and Bicknell's thrush, on JDI and adjacent government lands. Another project received SFI grant funding to help FPInnovations work with JDI on continuous improvement of harvesting techniques. FPInnovations is a non-profit forest research institute with partners across Canada.
Sept. 27, 2017 – Tree planting charity, Tree Canada is celebrating its 25th anniversary on National Tree Day Wednesday by planting its 82 millionth tree in Canada.

Over the past 20 years, Tree Canada has engaged communities, governments, corporations and individuals in the pursuit of a greener and healthier living environment, and provides Canadians with education, technical expertise, and resources to plant and care for urban and rural trees. In the midst of its most impactful year to date, in 2017, Tree Canada announced a more than $1 million investment to restore the forests destroyed by the devastating Fort McMurray wildfires last year.

"Growing in size every year, National Tree Day helps remind Canadians of the importance of trees — how they beautify our communities, naturally cool our cities in the summer, and combat climate change, and help improve human health," said Michael Rosen, president of Tree Canada. "As Tree Canada celebrates our 25th year of growing greener, healthier places for Canadians to live, we look forward to 25 more years of playing a leading role in the preservation of Canada's  urban forest across the country."   

As the largest urban forest organization in the country, Tree Canada also celebrated the 150th anniversary of Confederation with 150 tree-planting initiatives in communities in every province and territory across the country.

Tree Canada has been a driving force behind the establishment of a National Tree Day in Canada. It falls on the third week of September, which is recognized as National Forest Week across the country. Until October 1st, Canadians can take The National Tree Day Challenge at nationaltreeday.ca for their chance to win a trip to Banff, Alta.

"Throughout Canada's  history, our trees and forests have helped to define us as a nation and shape us as a people. On this day – National Tree Day – I would like to commend Tree Canada for the remarkable work they have done for 25 years to promote our nation's forests,” said Minister of Natural Resources Canada Jim Carr.

On National Tree Day, Tree Canada will mark its 25th anniversary with a ceremonial tree planting near the Bytown Museum at 1 Canal Lane, just below Parliament Hill. The event gets under way at 12:15 p.m. and will feature special guests including The Honourable Jim Carr, Minister of Natural Resources, The Honourable Joyce Murray, MP Vancouver Quadra and Ottawa City Councillor Catherine McKenney.
Sept. 26, 2017 - This year, Festival of Forestry took a group of 20 school teachers out into the forest to learn about sustainable forest management, and ways to educate their students about B.C.’s forests.

Watch the video above.
Sept. 26, 2017 – Members of the Alberta Forest Products Association (AFPA) planted 80 million coniferous tree seedlings in forests throughout the province in 2017. This means that for every Albertan, 19 trees were planted during this year’s spring and summer planting season.  

"Our association is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year," said AFPA president and chief executive officer Paul Whittaker. “Planting trees is an important part of our past and our future. In many areas, forest companies are now harvesting trees that were planted by pioneers in the industry several generations ago. By planting today, we are ensuring sustainable forests for future generations of Albertans.”  

Honourable Oneil Carlier, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry, congratulated the association on their commitment to healthy forests. “Eighty million trees is an impressive feat. Our government is committed to working with AFPA members to maintain healthy forests that create jobs and provide a place for recreation and cultural activities. I am very proud to say that Alberta has some of the most sustainably managed forests in the world.”

In additional to promoting environmental sustainability, tree planting is also good for Alberta’s economy. Tree planters, who are often youth and post-secondary students, worked 40,500 person days in 2017. Other sectors, including tree nurseries, equipment suppliers, environmental consultants, restaurants, and hotels also benefit from tree planting activity.

The AFPA is celebrating its 75th Anniversary this week at the Association’s Annual General Meeting and Conference in Jasper. In addition, Canada’s National Forest Week runs from September 24-31.      

More information can be found on the website.



The Alberta Forest Products Association is a private, non-profit industry organization, representing lumber, panelboard, pulp and paper, and secondary manufacturing wood products companies operating in Alberta. AFPA member companies are active participants in sustainability advancements that contribute economic, environmental, and social benefits for Albertans. 
Sept. 15, 2017 - Haliburton Forest & Wildlife Reserve has partnered with Bluesource Canada to leverage the value generated by the Ontario carbon market to commit to long-term stewardship that maximizes CO2 emissions sequestered by the forest.
Sept. 7, 2017 - Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) has launched a new website – www.cariboufacts.ca – to share facts with Canadians about caribou herds and to urge the federal government to build caribou plans that address the many complex factors that are impacting caribou populations across the country. FPAC also wants to ensure that the government's plans don't unnecessarily put rural and northern jobs at risk.
Aug. 22, 2017 - Canada’s leading forest products companies and the 230,000 people we employ in hundreds of communities across the country are urging the federal government to give serious thought to adjusting the procedures and timing of the Caribou Recovery Strategy to achieve a more balanced and sustainable way forward for all.
Aug. 16, 2017 - After a year of operation in Burns Lake, B.C., the Chinook Community Forest is being hailed as a success for the community and shareholders.
July 31, 2017 - The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Canada, the leading independent certifier of forest management practices, is pleased the federal government has issued a draft action plan to support Canada's boreal caribou population, but believes the plan must do more to encourage better responsible forest management practices as a vital element to protecting caribou and other species at risk.

FSC Canada will consider submitting formal comments on the plan as part of the government's public consultation process, issued on July 27, 2017.

"Plans to help species at risk, such as the woodland caribou, cannot be made in isolation to the overall needs for responsible management of our forests," said François Dufresne, president of FSC Canada. "We need to ensure more of our forests are managed to the standards that not only protect wildlife but do so while also meeting our economic, social and environmental needs, as well as those of Indigenous Peoples for generations to come. The revised new FSC standards for Canada have been developed to achieve just that."

FSC Canada is concerned with the recent report by the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) that documents how Canada is lagging behind in meeting its commitments under the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity. FSC believes that current forest management practices hinder Canada meeting biodiversity targets set for 2020.

Roughly 20 per cent, representing 55 million hectares, of the managed forest area in Canada is FSC certified. But irresponsible forestry can be a major threat. If all of that activity was required to meet FSC standards, that risk would be greatly mitigated, including protecting species at risk such as woodland caribou and the rights of aboriginal Peoples.

The FSC standard offers a solution for Canada to properly implement its commitments to both the Nagoya convention for biodiversity protection and the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP). By submitting formal comments to the new action plan, FSC Canada hopes to cooperate with the federal government in reaching the 2020 biodiversity goals.
July 12, 2017 - Help shape the future of responsible forest management at the triennial global General Assembly of the Forest Stewardship Council, taking place in Vancouver on Oct. 8-13, 2017.
July 7, 2017 - A community forest in Williams Lake, B.C., is planning to create a fuel break to prevent a wind-driven wildfire from reaching a nearby residential area.
July 6, 2017 - PRT Growing Services (PRT) has acquired Skimikin Nursery in Tappen, B.C.
June 28, 2017 - The annual general meeting of the Forest Stewardship Council Canada, is being held in Montreal June 28-29 to finalize its new forest management standard to ensure Canada's forests meet all future needs.
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