Forestry Management
Aug. 9, 2018 - Maritime Innovation Limited — J.D. Irving Limited’s (JDI) research lab in Sussex, N.B. — is one of only three places in the world that applies genetic science to grow softwood trees to sustain healthy forests and related forest products jobs. That means growing taller, straighter and more disease-resistant trees faster than they’re being harvested. The original seed sources are from local parent trees selected from forests across the region.
Aug. 8, 2018 - Field Surveys are an important part of sustainable forest management. Most of the forest departments across Canada have been using traditional paper-based surveys. However, Manitoba Forestry and Peatlands Branch digitalized their survey workflow using mobile geospatial technology. Tony Viveiros and Marianne Porteous at Manitoba Sustainable Development elaborate more on their use of geographic information system (GIS) technology to increase efficiency and collaboration across the department.
Aug. 2, 2018 - TimberWest is once again a classroom to a group of excited summer students, eager to further their knowledge of the forest industry.
July 27, 2018 - Effective July 25, 2018, the allowable annual cut for Western Forest Products’ Tree Farm Licence 37 is 847,000 cubic metres.

This new cut level includes a partition, so that no more than 770,200 cubic metres per year can be harvested from areas suitable for ground-based harvesting systems.

“After reviewing all of the factors involved, consulting with First Nations and considering information provided by the licensee, I am satisfied that the new allowable annual cut reflects government’s objectives for all forest resources within Tree Farm Licence 37, and will sustain the timber supply over the next 10 years,” said Shane Berg, deputy chief forester.

The cut level is about a five per cent reduction from the previous allowable annual cut of 889,415 cubic metres set in 2009, when 18,351 hectares were removed from Tree Farm Licence 37 to form a portion of the Pacific Timber Supply Area.

The reduction is consistent with a previously projected decline in the harvest level. It will ensure there is no disruption in the timber supply over the next decade, as harvesting in the tree farm licence gradually transitions from old-growth to second-growth timber.

Located in the Nimpkish Valley on the northern half of Vancouver Island, Tree Farm Licence 37 covers nearly 160,000 hectares, with approximately 86,000 hectares available for timber harvesting. It includes the communities of Port McNeill, Sayward and Woss.

The new allowable annual cut takes into consideration biodiversity, old-growth forest management and wildlife habitat protection, as well as social, cultural heritage and economic factors in the region.

The dominant tree species are western hemlock, mountain hemlock, western red cedar, balsam, Douglas fir and yellow cedar.

The deputy chief forester’s allowable annual cut determination is an independent, professional judgment based on information ranging from technical forestry reports, First Nations and public input to the government’s social and economic objectives.

Under the Forest Act, the chief forester must determine the allowable annual cut in each of the province’s 37 timber supply areas and 34 tree farm licences at least once every 10 years.
July 23, 2018 - An additional 980.5 hectares of the Coastal Douglas-fir ecosystem has been protected in 19 land parcels near the communities of Bowser, Qualicum Beach, Nanoose Bay and Cedar on Vancouver Island, and on Galiano and Salt Spring islands.

The Coastal Douglas-fir ecosystem is ranked both globally and provincially as a high priority for preservation, and is home to many endangered plant communities. Of the global range of Coastal Douglas-fir ecosystems, 80 per cent occur in the southern Strait of Georgia area. Of the 256,800 hectares in British Columbia, only nine per cent, or 23,500 hectares, is provincially owned.

The province consulted with 19 First Nations regarding the proposal to protect additional lands. In addition, the proposal was advertised for public review and comment from November 2017 to January 2018. Over 1,078 submissions were received, with 98 per cent supportive of the proposal.

The final set of approved parcels was based on the results of public review and First Nations consultation. Some of the parcels are of interest to First Nations.  

The area of Coastal Douglas-fir ecosystem protected from logging now totals over 11,000 hectares. The protection has legal authority by way of amendment to the Coastal Douglas-fir Order under the Land Act. Under the Coastal Douglas-fir land-use order, the protected lands are managed for enhanced stewardship and conservation.
July 20, 2018 - The Cascade Lower Canyon Community Forest (CLCCF), a community forest organization based in Hope, B.C., saw a strong year in 2017. 
July 19, 2018 - Canadian youth are being encouraged to find and keep green jobs with a number of paid positions being offered over the next year.

July 18, 2018 - An audit of forestry activities on seven woodlots, in the Nadina Natural Resource District, has found all seven had some type of non-compliance with the Forest and Range Practices Act and/or the Wildfire Act, according to the audit reports.

“The auditors found that woodlot licensees did not meet obligations related to reforesting previously logged sites on three woodlots, and did not meet requirements for reporting their activities to government on four woodlots,” said Bruce Larson, vice-chair, Forest Practices Board.

On three woodlots, the licensees did not meet requirements for preparing fire-hazard assessments, although they did abate fire hazards by piling and burning logging debris. One woodlot licensee neither assessed nor abated fire hazards, and failed to meet the requirements of the Wildfire Act.

“Assessing fire hazard is a legal requirement, and must be completed at required intervals after harvest has started,” said Larson. “Any identified hazards must be abated to reduce the risks of a forest fire starting or spreading.”

The audit found that all of the woodlot licensees met requirements of the Forest and Range Practices Act for operational planning and timber harvesting, as well as road and bridge construction and maintenance. All activities carried out between October 2015 and October 2017 were examined.

The board audited a total of 11 woodlots in the district. Reports on the results for the other four woodlots can be found on the board’s website.

The Forest Practices Board is B.C.’s independent watchdog for sound forest and range practices, reporting its findings and recommendations directly to the public and government. The board audits forest and range practices on public lands and appropriateness of government enforcement. It can also make recommendations for improvement to practices and legislation.
July 17, 2018 - The Forest Practices Board will examine the activities of Western Forest Products Inc. on tree farm licence 39, in the Campbell River Natural Resource District, during the week of July 23, 2018.

Auditors will examine whether harvesting, roads, silviculture, fire protection and associated planning, carried out between July 1, 2017, and July 27, 2018, met the requirements of the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act.

Tree farm licence 39 is made up of four geographical areas called blocks. This audit will examine activities in blocks 2 and 5. Block 2 is located northwest of Campbell River, near the community of Sayward, and Block 5 is located about 65 kilometres north of Campbell River, on the mainland coast.

In the past year, Western Forest Products Inc. has harvested approximately one million cubic metres of timber from Block 2. While there has been no recent harvesting in Block 5, auditors will examine roads and silviculture.

Once the audit work is complete, a report will be prepared, and any party that may be adversely affected by the audit findings will have a chance to respond. The board’s final report and recommendations then will be released to the public and government.

The Forest Practices Board is B.C.’s independent watchdog for sound forest and range practices, reporting its findings and recommendations directly to the public and government. The board audits forest and range practices on public land, as well as appropriateness of government enforcement.
July 6, 2018 - The Forest Practices Board has released its 2017-18 annual report, which summarizes the board’s work over the past fiscal year and highlights its current projects.

During the year, the board published 18 reports: eight complaint investigations, six audits, two special reports and one special investigation. Part of the board’s role is to receive concerns from the public about matters pertaining to the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act. This year, the board received 83 concerns, eight of which are now complaints under investigation.

A variety of topics were reported on this year, including the management of at-risk plant communities, grizzly bear habitat, and biodiversity at the landscape level. Other examples include potential impacts from forestry on water quality and supply, road construction on steep slopes and the efficacy of government initiatives.

The annual report also highlights responses from both government and industry to recommendations made by the board in reports published in the past couple of years.

The Forest Practices Board is B.C.’s independent watchdog for sound forest and range practices, reporting its findings and recommendations directly to the public and government. The board audits forest and range practices on public lands and appropriateness of government enforcement. It can also make recommendations for improvement to practices and legislation.

Read the full report here.
July 4, 2018 - The Forest Practices Board will examine the activities of A&A Trading Ltd. (A&A) and Terminal Forest Products Ltd. (Terminal) on forest licence A19229, in the Sunshine Coast Natural Resource District, during the week of July 9, 2018.

Auditors will examine whether harvesting, roads, silviculture, fire protection and associated planning, carried out by A&A and Terminal between July 1, 2016, and July 13, 2018, met the requirements of the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act.

The audit area is located near Sechelt and Powell River, in the Sunshine Coast Timber Supply Area (TSA). Forest licence A19229 has an allowable annual cut of 125,966 cubic metres per year, and is located on rugged and remote terrain, accessible only by helicopter and boat. The TSA is home to several species at risk, including the marbled murrelet and the northern goshawk.

Once the audit work is complete, a report will be prepared, and any party that may be adversely affected by the audit findings will have a chance to respond. The board’s final report and recommendations then will be released to the public and government.

The Forest Practices Board is B.C.’s independent watchdog for sound forest and range practices, reporting its findings and recommendations directly to the public and government. The board audits forest and range practices on public land, as well as appropriateness of government enforcement.
July 3, 2018 - A stretch of boreal forest along the Manitoba-Ontario border has been declared a UNESCO world heritage site. 

Pimachiowin Aki (“The Land That Gives Life”) is a forest landscape crossed by rivers and studded with lakes, wetlands, and boreal forest. It forms part of the ancestral home of the Anishinaabeg, an indigenous people living from fishing, hunting and gathering. 

The area encompasses the traditional lands of four Anishinaabeg communities (Bloodvein River, Little Grand Rapids, Pauingassi and Poplar River). It is an exceptional example of the cultural tradition of Ji-ganawendamang Gidakiiminaan (“keeping the land”), UNESCO stated, which consists of honouring the gifts of the Creator, respecting all forms of life and maintaining harmonious relations with others. A complex network of livelihood sites, habitation sites, travel routes and ceremonial sites, often linked by waterways, embodies this tradition.
June 28, 2018 - At the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, we believe forests are the answer to many of our local, national and global challenges.
June 28, 2018 - Domtar has released its 2018 Sustainability Update, highlighting the company’s ongoing efforts to take a longer-term view of creating and preserving value for shareholders, customers, employees and communities. In an update to its 2017 reportDomtar announced that the company has met or exceeded three of the company’s six 2020 sustainability goals this year.

“At Domtar, everyone has a role in sustainability because it is how we do business every day,” explained John D. Williams, Domtar’s president and CEO. “Sustainability is an integral part of our long-term growth strategy, which is exactly why we have been able to meet or surpass half of our 2020 sustainability goals already in 2018 — and why we are well on track to achieve the remaining.”

Highlighted in the 2018 update, Domtar’s commitment to integrating sustainability into its long-term growth strategy resulted in key accomplishments across the company’s 2020 goals, including:

  • An 18 per cent reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions since 2010, surpassing Domtar’s 2020 goal of 15 per cent. Domtar’s 2020 goal has been to reduce total direct and indirect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from purchased energy at pulp and paper mills 15 per cent by 2020 from 2010 levels. Fuel switching of six power boilers from coal to natural gas over the past few years provided the majority of reductions.
  • Completion of a water-cost model for Domtar’s pulp and paper mills ahead of 2020 schedule. The 2020 goal to develop a model for the company’s pulp and paper mills to measure and more strategically manage the full cost of using water was achieved this year. The model was informed by conducting pilot studies at five mills over the past two years to incorporate unique, site-specific water conditions. Domtar plans to begin operationalizing the full cost of water into its business decisions and conducting additional water-cost assessments at other mills in 2018.
  • An increase in the level of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified fibre procured for Domtar pulp and paper mills to 22 per cent of total fibre use, exceeding the company’s 2020 goal of 20 per cent. Domtar remains committed to lowering the technical and financial hurdles to increasing forest certification in its wood procurement regions.
The 2018 Sustainability Update also demonstrated how the company is on track to achieve its remaining 2020 goals, making notable progress in key areas, including:

  • Reduction of Domtar’s recordable safety incident rate to 0.78, the company’s best year on record — and a 55 per cent reduction since 2008. The company is working toward achieving its 2020 goal to reduce its recordable safety incident rate to 0.50 by increasing focus and efforts on prevention of serious injuries and eliminating non-core, high-hazard tasks where possible.
  • Expansion of Domtar’s EarthChoice Ambassador (ECA) program to 76 per cent of company facilities. As of 2018, Domtar has established ECA teams in 26 locations across four countries, bringing the company closer to its goal of engaging employees in sustainability through our ECA program in every facility by 2020.
  • Reduction of total waste sent to landfills from pulp and paper mills by 36 per cent since 2013, approaching the 2020 goal of 40 per cent reduction from 2013 levels. Progress on reducing the amount of materials our mills send to landfills is the result of source reduction initiatives and new and expanded beneficial use programs.
For more details on Domtar’s sustainability performance metrics and trends, click here.

“At Domtar, our investment in sustainability is rooted in responsibility, efficiency and engagement,” said Paige Goff, Domtar's vice-president of sustainability. “Our commitment to sustainability enables us to inspire our employees, reduce risks, enhance brand reputation, drive business success and grow shareholder value.”

To learn more about how responsibility, efficiency and engagement drive Domtar’s overall sustainability investments and initiatives, click here.

As an accompaniment to its 2018 Sustainability Update, Domtar also created a brief video that illustrates the company’s commitment to sustainability. While corporate sustainability reports are traditionally complex, Domtar’s latest video brings the company’s 2020 sustainability journey to life, helping make a technical subject more accessible — and inspiring — to all audiences.

Domtar makes a wide variety of everyday products from sustainable wood fiber, and is one of the world’s largest producers of a complete line of absorbent hygiene solutions and an innovator in absorbent technology. With approximately 10,000 employees serving more than 50 countries around the world, Domtar is driven by a commitment to turn sustainable wood fibre into useful products that people rely on every day.
June 27, 2018 - Kevin Kriese has been appointed chair of the Forest Practices Board.

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