March 29, 2018 - As a business owner, you do not simply purchase a wood grinder or chipper, you invest hard earned money in an asset that over time is expected to produce revenue for your business. To maximize this revenue, the machine must work consistently and efficiently, producing a merchandisable product for your market. Machine downtime and inefficient operation will create excessive expenses increasing operating costs, which reduces your gross profit.
Feb. 26, 2018 - This year’s challenge consisted of mid-size, full-size and HD entries – 10 trucks total – all vying for a win in what is now the 11th year of the Canadian Truck King Challenge. We tested 10 2018 pickup trucks covering the 2500 HD segment; two midsize and five full-size pickups completed the rest of the 2018 entries. A complete list of scores by model reveal our choice for the winner of the 2018 Canadian Truck King Challenge.
Jan. 23, 2018 - Ponsse celebrates two important milestones today. The biggest extension project in the company's history has reached the topping-out phase, and the factory has produced the 13,000th forest machine made in the Vieremä facility in Finland.      

Ponsse machine number 13,000, a PONSSE Ergo 8w, was delivered to the company's German customer FoWi GmbH & Co. This also marks the beginning of Ponsse's and German distributor Wahlers Forsttechnik GmbH's jubilee year: 25 years have passed since Ponsse and Wahlers signed their contract on distribution and service collaboration in the German-speaking regions of Europe. The seeds of this collaboration were sown already in the early 1970s when Einari Vidgrén, Ponsse's founder, was logging on a storm devastation sites in Germany.

Quality and flexibility through investments
The current production facility investment is the biggest in Ponsse's history: the factory will expand from the current 2.7 hectares to 4 hectares. Most importantly, the investment contributes to ongoing improvement and development of quality, flexibility, safety and productivity of Ponsse's operations. The extension of production facilities enables the company to respond to changing market situations with more flexibility, and to tailor machines to customer requirements more efficiently in a serial-production environment. The new facilities in Vieremä will be completed by the end of the year, and will be the most advanced forest machine production facility in the world.  

Our strong focus on the development of cut-to-length forest machines requires constant development of our production operations. That is the only way we can fulfill the needs of our customers and stay at the forefront of technology in the demanding forest machine market. A safe, modern factory is also an important investment in our employees, says Ponsse's president and chief executive officer Juho Nummela. 

The Ponsse factory in Vieremä currently employs 570 employees, 390 of whom work in production tasks. All Ponsse forest machines are made in Vieremä, Finland.

13_000._PONSSE_group_2.jpg New factory in operation by end of year 
New assembly lines and storage facilities housed in the new extension will be phased in gradually during 2018. Relocation to new facilities starts in March with warehouse operations. New smart warehouse technologies make production warehouse logistics more efficient and increase the degree of automation considerably. Warehouse automation covers 15,500 storage slots for small items and components and 3,900 pallet positions. 

After the warehouse relocation, a new harvester head assembly line will move to the new facilities. A new assembly line for base machines will be in operation by the end of the summer, and by end of 2018 cabin and crane assembly lines will also be renewed. The amount of production-time testing used to support quality control will increase in all production lines.

High-quality work from local experts 
Starting with earthworks, most of the factory extension has been built by local companies. The massive project was split into several smaller parts to enable local companies to offer their services. The main contractor, construction company U. Lipsanen, delivered the factory extension project that was started one year ago to Ponsse today.
Dec. 21, 2017 - Following FPInnovations and Laval University’s industrial NSERC Chair recommendations, Alberta Transportation recently changed its Winter Weight Premium (WWP) policy allowing an estimated average of 8 days of WWP extension.
Dec. 21, 2017 - Traction-assist equipment has been gaining traction in B.C.’s forestry industry in recent years. In recognition of the health and safety considerations that arise from new technology, WorkSafeBC has created an equipment inspection checklist to help employers ensure safety requirements are being met.

The checklist is available on worksafebc.com, and is divided into eight sections according to the relevant regulations: emergency site-specific procedures; operation of traction-assist equipment; safe work areas; radio-controlled equipment; equipment guarding and emergency escape; equipment inspection and maintenance; rigging and attachment points; and anchors.

Download the full list.

 
Dec. 6, 2017 - Chevy recently partnered with John Deere at its world headquarters to show off its newest version of the HD Silverado pickup. The reason? A work-related backdrop is vital to understanding the needs of the HD truck owner and frankly what looks better than some spanking new construction equipment towed by shiny 2018 Chevy pickups?
Nov. 14, 2017 - Global demand for forestry equipment is forecast to reach $9.2 billion on gains of 4.5 per cent per year, more than four times faster than in the 2011-2016 period. Gains will be driven by the transition from manual to mechanical logging solutions in the developing economies of the Africa/Mideast and Asia/Pacific regions and Latin America, as well as the rise of logging methods, such as cut-to-length, that require more sophisticated (and expensive) forestry equipment in industrialized nations like Canada and Finland. Global Forestry Equipment, 2nd Edition, a new study from The Freedonia Group, a Cleveland-based industry research firm, offers in-depth analysis of these and other trends.

Western Europe, the world's largest exporter of forestry equipment, will see its trade surplus increase by $200 million to $1.0 billion in 2021. Factors driving these gains include the reputation of West European forestry equipment suppliers, whose hefty R&D budgets deliver cutting edge products, and the massive scale of their global distribution networks. The Asia/Pacific region, the only other global market with a trade surplus in this industry, will see an increase of $70 million as local producers and foreign multinationals invest heavily in new production capacity and upgrading existing facilities.

Felling machinery will see the fastest gains of all product segments through 2021. Demand for felling machinery is projected to rise nearly 5 per cent per year through 2021 as market conditions improve in the US and other mature markets, and logging sector mechanization rates in developing nations increase. Sales of separately sold parts and attachments will rise 4 per cent annually as the global stock of forestry equipment grows and more advanced attachments are developed. In dollar terms, chippers and grinders will experience the fastest growth in the forecast period as global demand for wood pellets as a power plant feedstock rises and the use of on-site processing equipment in developing nations increases.

Related studies include:
Nov. 8, 2017 - Western Forest Products Inc. announced on Tuesday the closure of its Englewood logging train. This announcement is consistent with the company's ongoing efforts to reduce costs and strengthen its competitiveness. Logs will be transported by truck at a lower cost to create efficiencies in the transportation of logs to its mills from northern Vancouver Island forestry operations.

At peak operations, the train employed 34 people. As a result of the closure of the train, these positions will be eliminated. The company will work with its employees and union representatives to identify opportunities for the impacted employees to transition to other positions within its operations. Accordingly, the reduction in overall jobs is anticipated to be fewer than 15. As always, the company is committed to work with its employees in a fair and equitable manner.

Western employs over 3,500 employees and contractors on the coast, of which 600 are directly employed on northern Vancouver Island. Western remains focused on ensuring the safe, competitive, long-term viability of its operations for the benefit of its employees, shareholders, and the communities in which it operates.
June 19, 2017 - According to research published in the Southern Journal of Applied Forestry 35(4), using in-forest weighing scales can boost the payload efficiency of log trucks.
June 1, 2017 - John Deere is launching a longed-for global first at Elmia Wood. The company has now developed its crane-tip control for harvesters too. There will also be the opportunity to test operate several forest machines plus do tests on simulators at the John Deere stand.

“Visitors can try out the new technology during the fair,” says Dieter Reinisch of John Deere.

Crane-tip control for forest machines is a true Elmia Wood innovation, which has been developed over the past three fairs. John Deere presented the concept with the help of a forwarder simulator in 2009, which contractors could test and comment on. At Elmia Wood 2013 it was time for the world premiere of forwarders with crane-tip control, which has become a much-appreciated function.

“Our customers say they move an extra load every shift thanks to crane-tip control,” Reinisch says.

And now it’s time for what the industry has been talking about for ten years: crane-tip control for harvesters. This world first is being presented at Elmia Wood, installed in a John Deere 1270 harvester. Visitors to the fair can test the function both in reality and on simulators.

John Deere is also presenting an updated version of its crane-tip control for harvesters. The innovations are in the software, which means that contractors who already have the function on their forwarders can obtain the innovations at their next service opportunity.

All of John Deere’s machine models will be exhibited at the fair, including the three new mid-size forwarders in the G series: the 1110G, 1210G and 1510G. Also being shown is the first harvester in the G series, the 1170G with eight wheels. It is a smaller-size machine with a broad range of uses from thinning to easier final felling.

One recurring request at previous fairs has been for the opportunity to test operate the machines. This wish will now be granted. John Deere is offering the chance to test operate its forwarders with a rotating and levelling cab. This function is almost standard in the Nordic markets but elsewhere contractors often choose a fixed cab for cost reasons.

“At Elmia Wood they have the chance to experience the added value of a rotating and levelling cab,” Reinisch says. 




Elmia Wood 7-10 June

Elmia Wood is the world’s leading forestry fair and is held every four years outdoors in the forest south of Jönköping, Sweden. The last Elmia Wood (2013) had over 500 exhibitors and 50,000 visitors from around the world and was monitored by the international trade press. On 7–10 June 2017 the global forest industry will gather once more.
May 26, 2017 - Forestry tires are expensive. Take some simple, common-sense precautions to protect your investment and get the most service life and maximum safety out of your tires.

Forestry-duty rubber tires are a big investment for logging operators. A set of tires for a four-wheeled skidder can cost upwards of $12,000 USD and fl otation or dual tires can be even more expensive. Skidders, forwarders and drive-to-tree feller bunchers all operate in the most extreme off road conditions of heat, cold, mud, rocks and abrasive soil. Rubber tires can wear prematurely (or fail catastrophically) if not properly looked after. Fortunately, by taking some simple, common-sense precautions, operators can protect their investment and get the most service life and maximum safety out of their tires.

First and foremost, operators need to be checking their tire pressure regularly – preferably on a daily or at least weekly basis. Under infl ation can cause excessive heat buildup leading to damage to the sidewall, beads or lining. On the other hand, an over infl ated tire is more vulnerable to impact damage. Always check the tire pressure against the Tigercat and tire manufacturers’ service recommendations.

When using band tracks (on bogie axle machines) tire pressure should be set to the maximum recommended pressure. This prevents the tires from squatting too much under heavy loads which can strain and damage the tire sidewalls against the side members of the band tracks. This also helps prevent the tires from spinning on the wheels and damaging their sealing beads. (Note – traction aids should only be used on Tigercat skidders with pre-approval from Tigercat Customer Service to ensure warranty coverage.)

Operator training and behavior are also both critical to extending tire life. Two particular areas that operators need to be aware of are the use of differential locks and planning for the best driving path.

Differential locks provide extra traction by forcing both wheels on a vehicle to spin at the same speed rather than allowing each wheel to spin at different speeds depending on traction. Pre-emptive use of differential locks in difficult terrain (muddy, steep or dusty) helps to minimize the amount of wheel spin. Many operators wait until they notice wheel spin before using the differential locks. This can lead to severe tire damage as large pieces of rubber can be sheared off if the tire makes contact with a sharp rock or stump when spinning. Differential locks should be engaged in anticipation of difficult terrain as much as possible to minimize this risk, but should be left off for driving on less challenging terrain.

Finally, operators need to select the best driving path whenever possible. Operators need to be aware of the geography in the working area and carefully plan the route to be driven. How steep are the slopes? Are there areas or deep mud or hard-to-spot hollows? Going around an obstacle or mound or steep incline may take a little longer, but the savings in fuel and tire damage may well make it worthwhile. Always keep both eyes and your mind open when driving off road. 

Read more at www.tigercat.com
Feb. 10, 2017 - Nine-axle logging trucks, including tandem-drive and tridem-drive configurations, are now approved and in use on a key transportation route in the Vanderhoof area in north-central British Columbia. The approval was the culmination of a four-year collaborative effort between FPInnovations, the B.C. Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure (MoTI), the B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO), and the forest industry.
Jan. 5, 2017 - Forestry and off-road equipment operators and maintenance technicians are used to dealing with obvious dangers from spinning saws and falling tree limbs, but may be less familiar with a critical danger that can cause crippling injuries or death – high-pressure injection injuries.
Dec. 12, 2016 - Fuel quality is critical to keep Tier 4 engines running smoothly, and the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) has released a downloadable infographic to help equipment owners and users keep their machines up and running.

The AEM “Get CLEAN on Fuel” infographic outlines five key actions that help protect Tier 4 engines “because while the new engines reduce diesel emissions and protect our health and the environment, the fact is they are rather finicky about fuel,” said William “Bernie” Bernhard, AEM technical and safety services manager.

Bernhard explained that today’s Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) is very different from the diesel of just a few years ago.

“Among other things, it is subject to change and contamination as it moves from the refinery to the engine, making storage, temperature, age and filtration, and related factors critical in maintaining fuel quality,” said Bernhard.

AEM member company experts came together through the association to develop the guidelines as a way to spread more awareness of the importance of diesel fuel quality.

5 Steps to Maintain Fuel Quality

The new AEM fuel-quality infographic relays 5 quick tips using the CLEAN acronym, accompanied by actionable guidelines:

C - Commit to understanding your T4 engine

L - Learn the facts about today’s fuel

E - Evaluate your fuel source and fuel handling

A - Always follow manufacturer guidelines

N - Never take your role for granted


AEM Clean Fuel Tips Tier 4 Engines


Download the complete infographic at aem.org/clean.
Oct. 18, 2016 - Resources created by a working group which consisted of fallers, engineers, road builders and contract managers can help fallers and others who work below avoid the hazards from excessive roadside debris on steep ground.
Page 1 of 8

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew

Popular Articles

Marketplace


We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.