June 22, 2018 - Dust Safety Week is coming to a close after five days of coverage on dust safety best practices, technical information and solutions to help pellet plants and sawmills keep their operations and operators safe.



Our video this year highlights the importance of learning from each other’s experiences through sharing stories. Fornebu Lumber’s safety and training co-ordinator Christian Fournier describes an incident where two fires were both ignited and safely put out in one day. 

“We were very lucky that our staff acted very quickly and safely in order to contain the fire from spreading,” Fournier said.

Fournier said he chose to share this experience with others, including Fornebu Lumber’s corrective actions following the incident, to prevent this type of situation from occurring elsewhere. You can also find more details about the incident in Fournier’s article published this week.

Among our other main stories, you can also read about preventing a dust collector inlet explosion by regular CFI contributor and dust mitigation expert John Bachynski.

Fike’s Jef Snoeys, Jeff Mycroft, and Dave Buchanan outline concerns that arise from dust created during the processing of wood biomass, and best practices in the industry to mitigate those concerns. 

And don’t miss the six questions to ask when choosing a dust collection system contractor by the VETS Group’s Erin Rayner.

Find those stories and much more from our archives on the Dust Safety Week 2018 landing page, which will continue to be a hub for the industry to learn best practices and find the latest information on dust safety and mitigation.

Content on our landing page will be hosted there for the next year for readers to reference.

Thank you to our sponsors and safety partners VETS and Fike:

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Published in Health and Safety
June 8, 2018 - To help raise awareness of the central role forests play for all life in Canada, Earth Rangers and the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) are running the Earth Rangers Living Forests Photo Competition, which is open to aspiring photographers aged 12 and under across Canada.
Published in News
May 15, 2018 - Guests at the 2018 Northeastern Forest Products Equipment Expo had the first-ever look at CBI’s newest horizontal grinder: the Magnum Force 6800CT.
Published in New Gear
April 30, 2018 - Matt Williams, president and CEO of Williams & White, introduces the German-manufactured Kohlbacher Shark 3000 profile grinder to the North American market at the BC Saw Filers Association 2018 convention in Kamloops, B.C. 
Published in File Week
April 30, 2018 - Josh Bergen, co-owner of Precision Machinery (PGMR), introduces their newly launched Kaiser knife grinder, a fully automated system that loads up to 500 disposable canter knives. PGMR launched the product at the 2018 BC Saw Filers Association convention in Kamloops, B.C.
Published in File Week
April 23, 2018 - In 2017, Tigercat developed and released its most compact skidder platform, the 602 series. The prototype 602 skidder was sent to France last summer to be fitted with a Belgian designed and manufactured swing boom for use in mountain regions of Europe.

Now the 602 is available as a cable skidder suited to pockets of North America and other traditional winch skidder markets. The 602 cable skidder is ideal for high value selective hardwood logging and for retrieving timber from steep slopes and gullies.

The 602 is equipped with the Tigercat FPT Tier N45 engine which provides full emissions compliance for Tier 2 and Tier 4f , along with excellent fuel economy. Both engines deliver 125 kW (168 hp) at 2,200 rpm.

The machine has a fixed front axle with an oscillating centre section to achieve a very narrow overall width of 2,7 metres (106 in). The agility of the 602 is ideal in selective felling applications. The machine can access high value timber in steep terrain, while minimizing damage to the residual stand.

Maximum fuel efficiency is achieved by the use of Tigercat’s load sensing hydraulic system — only supplying the amount of oil that the various functions require for reduced engine load.

The 602 cable skidder offering has already attracted a lot of attention in the United States, where the first machine debuted at the Paul Bunyan show in Cambridge, Ohio this past October.

Bill Shufflebotham, based in Rockport, Illinois purchased the first 602 cable skidder. He states, “It’s the only quality small machine on the market. It’s easy to move at nine feet wide and it’s powerful.”
Published in New Gear
April 10, 2018 - Site manager Dave Herzig welcomes CFI to Nechako Lumber and Premium Pellet, companies of Sinclar Group Forest Products, in Vanderhoof, B.C. The site utilizes 100 per cent of the fibre that enters its gates, either as lumber, wood pellets, heat or power.
Published in Mills
March 26, 2018 - My first impression of Fornebu Lumber Company’s single sawmill in northern New Brunswick was awe at its log yard. Heading up the driveway, the mill itself is hidden behind several mountainous decks of 8- and 9-foot sawlogs.
Published in Mills
March 20, 2018 - While on location for the Montreal Wood Convention, Canadian Forest Industries received an exclusive opportunity to join a group of foreign buyers on a study tour to two Quebec sawmills.

Groupe Crête Inc.’s Saint-Faustin-Lac-Carré mill was the first stop. The mill is one of two Quebec plants owned by the company — the other location is in Chertsey.

Saint-Faustin-Lac-Carré only produces softwood — mainly spruce and fir, with a small amount of jack pine (about five per cent). The mix is usually split in half but has been 65 per cent spruce and 35 per cent fir this year, Alain Gagnon, Groupe Crête’s director of sales explained.

This plant been at this location since 2000, but the Crête family bought it in 2011. The family traces its company roots back to 1949.

The mill produces 150 million board feet of softwood a year that is FSC-certified on-demand.

Its main customers are in Quebec, Ontario and the U.S., however 60 per cent of its products are sold in Quebec.  

In addition to lumber, the mill produces byproducts such as wood chips, which are then sold to pulp and paper mills — 45 per cent of the log volume is sent to pulp and paper mills.

The mill has two debarkers, which go through 35 logs a minute. The scanning is done in the sawmill, while the grading is done at the planer mill on site. Trimming is done to cut the maximum length possible for each piece, thereby optimizing the length on each one.

In the lug loader, the speed is 115 lugs a minute. Pieces that are too short go to the chipper and get sold to the aforementioned pulp and paper mills.

The bark at Saint-Faustin-Lac-Carré is burned to produce energy for the kiln and to heat the plant. About 50 per cent of the facility’s bark is used for energy production, including ash, and four tonnes of bark is burned per hour here.

The plant also has five batch kilns, four of which are Wellons and one of which is Cathilde.

Spruce takes approximately 35–45 hours to dry, depending on the season (summer to winter), while fir takes about 90–110 hours to dry in the same seasonal range due to its high water content.

Once the lumber is in the planer mill, the machine separates it by quality. Each piece is graded into seven grades. Then the lumber goes to the sorting bins where 140 pieces are graded per minute. That equals approximately 50,000 pieces a day. Pieces are cut according to the market price for each grade, Gagnon explained, but six feet is the shortest length here. The system is manufactured to produce North American lengths.


To get a peek at the second mill tour of the day, click here.



Catch up on the action with CFI’s live coverage of the 2018 Montreal Wood Convention on Twitter @CFIMag.

And read our full coverage of the event here.
Published in Mills
March 20, 2018 - While on location for the Montreal Wood Convention, Canadian Forest Industries received an exclusive opportunity to join a group of foreign buyers on a study tour to two Quebec sawmills. 

C.A. SPENCER Inc.’s Scierie Carrière Ltée is a hardwood specialty mill in Lachute where CFI experienced the second tour of the day.

Scierie Carrière is one of two sites owned by C.A. SPENCER. The second is Bois Hunting Inc. in Waterville, Que. 

Together, the two mills produce 30 million board feet of lumber a year, which altogether comes down to approximately 60,000 board feet of lumber produced in a day, and about 7,000 board feet produced in an hour. 

“Both mills each run a 20-hour day and night shift” among its more than 150 employees explained Max Cadrin, sales and marketing representative.

The mills works with varying lumber thicknesses ranging from 4/4 (1”) thru 12/4 (3”). Following the debarking process (which the tour members could not see due to safety measures), the lumber undergoes a metal detector to ensure no metal pieces are in the wood.

“With hardwoods, the good quality wood is found within the exterior part of the log,” operations manager Michel Ferron explained. Following this process, 2x3 and 4x4 cants are made. 

At Scierie Carrière, roughly 50 per cent of the total production is hard maple. Other main species are yellow birch, soft maple, red oak and basswood.

“There are six kilns here in Lachute with approximately 500,000 board feet per charge for the kiln capacity” Ferron explained. “Red oak for instance [which was being dried on site the day of our visit], takes roughly 35-45 days to dry depending on thickess,” he said.

C.A. SPENCER was founded in 1908, celebrating its 110th year in business in 2018 and spans five generations to this day.


To get a peek at the first mill tour of the day, click here.



Catch up on the action with CFI’s live coverage of the 2018 Montreal Wood Convention on Twitter @CFIMag.

And read our full coverage of the event here.
Published in Mills
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