Wood Panels
Dec. 10, 2018 - Sept. 30 to Oct. 3, 2019, Quebec City will host the second edition of the Woodrise, an international congress that brings together all the main stakeholders, decision-makers and professionals involved in mid-rise and high-rise building construction. The Program Committee, composed of industry members from various sectors, has been active for many weeks now in order to present a program that will meet or even surpass the participants' expectations.
Nov. 30, 2018 – Yesterday, Sidewalk Labs released their draft site plan for Toronto’s Quayside neighbourhood, which calls for using mass timber in its construction.
Nov. 23, 2018 – Columbia Forest Products (CFP) has acquired a hardwood veneer processing facility from 3A Composites in Ecuador. This is tied to a long-term sourcing agreement for FSC-Certified wood from fast-growth hardwood plantations in the region that will be used to make Columbia’s “MPX” hardwood plywood panels, featuring PureBond formaldehyde-free technology.
Sept. 25, 2018 - Structurlam is opening a mass timber facility in Okanagan Falls, B.C., in October. 
Sept. 24, 2018 - Building on the success of its high-speed equipment, Gilbert has added to its product line a planer for mass timber lumber.
Sept. 21, 2018 - A new case study published by APA – The Engineered Wood Association shows how mass timber proved to be the ideal material for First Tech Federal Credit Union’s new campus in Hillsboro, Oregon. The owners and design team say the finished building delivers on its quest to encourage the health and well-being of employees, reflect Pacific Northwest values and blend in with the surrounding park and trees.
Sept. 5, 2018 - Norbord Inc. is launching its second video to kick off "Thank a Framer" month this September. This video follows the process of manufacturing oriented strand board (OSB) from the forest to the construction site, paying homage to workers in the supply chain along the way. It aims to highlight the vital role framers play and supports Norbord's efforts to ease the construction labor shortage.
Aug. 28, 2018 - USNR’s veneer dryers are renowned for consistently producing high-quality veneer with a uniform dry moisture content and aesthetic appearance. Our systems offer the highest efficiency, using the least amount of energy while producing minimal exhaust.
Aug. 23, 2018 - Bill Fisch Forest Stewardship and Education Centre is the first project in Canada to be recognized by the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) as Living Building Challenge certified; the most rigorous sustainability standard in the world.
Aug. 15, 2018 - Despite mounting pressures to increase investments, reduce prices and source lumber from sustainable sources, the global market for unfinished wood/lumber products is expected to experience positive growth over the next five years, according to a new report from BCC Research.

The unfinished wood/lumber market reached a value of nearly $223.1 billion in 2017 and is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4.3 per cent to nearly $275.2 billion by 2022, according to the recently published report Unfinished Wood/Lumber Manufacturing: Global Markets to 2022.

Major players in the market are West Fraser Timber Co. Ltd., Canfor Corp., Weyerhaeuser Company, Interfor Corp. and Metsä Group.

Research Highlights
  • Hardwood is projected to experience the strongest growth between 2017 and 2022, resulting from increased demand for beams, boards and dimension lumber from building construction companies, as they are sturdier than softwood products.
  • Asia-Pacific was the largest region in the unfinished wood/lumber manufacturing market in 2017, accounting for 45.3 per cent of the global market.
  • Going forward, South America is expected to witness the fastest growth in the unfinished wood/lumber market, estimated to at grow at a CAGR of six per cent.
“The unfinished wood manufacturing market is benefiting from technological advances relating to wood treatment and processing,” the report notes. “Digital technologies such as big data and the internet of things (IoT) are being used to enhance manufacturing efficiency and reduce costs in the wood processing industry.”

Lumber Manufacturers Implementing Sustainable Wood Certifications
Many lumber production companies in developed economies are certifying their products though accreditation agencies to cater to environmentally conscious customers. Rise in awareness of deforestation, climate change and environmental concerns are increasing customer preference for products manufactured from wood sourced from companies having sustainable forest management accreditations. For instance, accreditations including the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification and the Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) are internationally recognized certifications for sustainable forest operations.



BCC Research is a publisher of market research reports that provide organizations with intelligence to drive smart business decisions. By partnering with industry experts worldwide, BCC Research provides unbiased measurements and assessments of global markets covering major industrial and technology sectors, including emerging markets. For more information about BCC Research, please visit bccresearch.com. Follow BCC Research on Twitter at @BCCResearch.
Aug. 14, 2018 - Decorative panel manufacturer Tafisa Canada has announced two first-of-their-kind innovations designed to provide the North American industry, designers and architects with unprecedented selection of high-end, affordable products that fill a market gap.
Aug. 3, 2018 - A group of 17 firefighters were on site at Norbord's OSB plant in 100 Mile House, B.C. on July 28 for a fire that measured 50 by 80 feet.

The fire was described as large in size and difficult to control prompting crews to fight it through the night until the morning of July 29.

Norbord staff are reported to have tried to extinguish the fire before crews arrived.

The fire is now completely extinguished. There were no injuries.

Read the full story here.
Aug. 2, 2018 - Norbord Inc. has reported Adjusted EBITDA of $273 million for the second quarter of 2018 versus $165 million in the second quarter of 2017 and $170 million in the first quarter of 2018.
July 12, 2018 - Building an ultra-energy efficient industrial-style building in a northern climate is no easy task, but the Wood Innovation Research Laboratory (WIRL) stands as proof it can be done.

Home to researchers seeking to discover novel materials and techniques for the next generation of tall wood buildings, the laboratory is itself an engineering marvel. It is a certified Passive House, the first building of its type in North America to exceed the exacting international standard.

“We pulled off something really amazing here,” says UNBC associate professor of engineering Dr. Guido Wimmers. “This building has caught the attention of Passive House researchers around the world because it demonstrates how an industrial structure, constructed with wood, in Northern British Columbia’s cold climate can be a global leader in energy efficiency.”

Certified Passive House buildings use up to 90 per cent less energy for heating and cooling when compared with standard buildings and use up to 70 per cent less energy overall.

As the building owner, UNBC provided in-house expertise on the Passive House requirement and shared ideas on how to develop design and building solutions with the architectural, engineering and construction teams. Wimmers, and others in the Master of Engineering in Integrated Wood Design program, worked closely with the contractors throughout the design and construction phase of the project.

“At UNBC, we have a lot of expertise in building science, the materials the go into Passive House buildings and how we operate our buildings,” says UNBC assistant director of facilities Dr. David Claus. “We’ve been able to put that all into practice on this project.”

That expertise, combined with the dedication to detail from all the project partners, resulted in impressive results.

WIRL set a new standard for air tightness, securing the best North American result of any building using the internationally recognized passive house standard. The testing protocol involves both pressurizing and depressurizing the building and measuring the number of air changes per hour that result. With a score of 0.07, WIRL surpassed the Passive House requirement by nearly a factor of 10.

The result is all the more impressive given the design requirements of the building. With a large bay door installed to facilitate the delivery of materials and a state-of-the-art dust extraction system required, there is a lot of potential for air leakage.

“The biggest challenge was the large overhead door,” Wimmers explains. “It is very difficult to find a manufacturer who can deliver a well-insulated and air-tight product.”

The big red door was sourced from Germany and the other doors and windows hail from Poland. European parts were required for those aspects of the building because Passive House manufacturing is still in its early stages in Canada.

Other components of the building were locally sourced, including the trusses used vertically in the design of the thick exterior walls.

“Using trusses as a vertical component is something unique,” Wimmers says. “I have been working in Passive Houses for more than 15 years and I have not seen any kind of technical system like this before.”

The 50-cm wide walls are rated R-80 and contain blown in mineral wool insulation. The roof is rated R-100 and required special certification from the Roofing Contractors Association of British Columba. Even the floor sits atop 20 cm of expanded polystyrene insulation.

“The entire envelope needs to be really well insulated,” Wimmers explains. “Everything has to be nicely wrapped with a warm blanket.”

Even with the air-tight design and extra insulation, the building also needs to be breathable so that any moisture that may accumulate is not trapped inside.  

Wimmers and Master of Engineering program graduate Stephanie Wall produced a comparative life-cycle assessment, looking at the wood-based Passive House design of WIRL and comparing it a wood structure, built to standard building code requirements; a steel structure designed to be a Passive House; and a steel structure built to code.

The wood designs contained much less embodied energy — or energy consumed during the production of building materials and the construction itself — compared with the steel buildings. The Passive House buildings use much less energy operationally, and the wood-Passive House design scored the best overall.

“A Passive house building outperforms a code building substantially in the long run,” Wimmers says. “It’s about a third of the environmental impact compared to a code building over 60 years.”

To further reduce WIRL’s carbon footprint, the University has signed a biogas contract. By using gas recovered from agricultural facilities and landfills, UNBC is able to lessen its reliance on fossil fuels.

The Passive House design, combined with the biogas fuel, means the building is expected to produce one per cent of greenhouse gas emissions compared with a conventional building.

There’s one more benefit to the Passive House that cannot be quantified.

“In Passive House we often talk all about the low energy use,” says Claus. “But because of the ventilation systems, they are also very comfortable to live in.”

Learn more about the Wood Innovation Research Lab through the Project Overview produced by naturally:wood.



This article was originally published by the University of Northern British Columbia. 
June 28, 2018 - Urbanisation is accelerating and creating pressure to increase housing construction. To answer this global challenge, construction needs to be quicker and more ecological. In Metsä Wood's new video, Mikko Saavalainen, senior vice-president of business development, and Juha Kasslin, vice-president of product management, explain what off-site wood construction has to offer.

At the moment, construction produces 30 per cent of the world's carbon dioxide emissions, and it is clear that the course must be changed. We need more ecologically sustainable solutions. Wood is the only major construction material that stores carbon. Wood is a renewable material, and when the wooden parts are no longer used in buildings, they can be reused or recycled.

Another key factor in urban construction is speed. The construction industry is undergoing a major transition, with construction moving from building sites to off-site manufacturing. Elements and modules are assembled in industrial factory conditions and delivered to building sites for quick installation. The lightness and strength properties of engineered wood products, like Kerto LVL (laminated veneer lumber), make off-site construction a very attractive option.

More efficient construction through prefabrication
Using prefabricated wooden elements significantly reduces time spent at the construction site. As most of the construction work is done indoors, there are no delays due to weather conditions. The turnaround time on building sites is shortened as the amount of errors is reduced and work safety is improved.

Metsä Wood's cut-to-size Kerto LVL products and optimised element production ensure material efficiency with minimum waste. Kerto LVL products have an excellent strength-to-size ratio, which means less construction material is needed, and therefore traffic to the building site is minimised.

Wood elements together with partners
Kerto LVL products make construction fast, light and green. Metsä Wood is actively building a partner network to increase off-site manufacturing of Kerto LVL elements for this purpose.

"The Kerto LVL ecosystem means a network of companies with who we can together develop and grow the use of wood elements in construction," says Laura Mattila, vice-president of sales development at Metsä Wood. "The strength of the ecosystem is based on everybody concentrating on their core competence. The sum of this is more than each party trying to do everything by themselves."

Metsä Wood's core competence is to produce Kerto LVL products on an industrial scale. Meanwhile, the element manufacturers carry out a lot of product development based on this versatile raw material.
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